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What Are the Basics of Bible Study? By John MacArthur

There is nothing more important for the Christian than to seek Jesus, hear from Him, obey Him, and proclaim Him daily. Few people that I know of have been more faithful in doing these four things than Pastor John MacArthur in our generation. Therefore, who better to write about on how to study the Bible than someone who has been doing it with great passion and great effectiveness for over fifty years. Enjoy this article by Pastor John MacArthur. – Dr. David P. Craig

Personal Bible study, in precept, is simple. I want to share with you 5 steps to Bible study which will give you a pattern to follow:

STEP 1—Reading. Read a passage of Scripture repeatedly until you understand its theme, meaning the main truth of the passage. Isaiah said, “Whom will he teach knowledge? And whom will he make to understand the message? Those just weaned from milk? Those just drawn from the breasts? For precept must be upon precept, precept upon precept, line upon line, here a little, there a little” (Is. 28:9,10).

Develop a plan on how you will approach reading through the Bible. Unlike most books, you will probably not read it straight through from cover to cover. There are many good Bible reading plans available, but here is one that I have found helpful.

Read through the Old Testament at least once a year. As you read, note in the margins any truths you particularly want to remember, and write down separately anything you do not immediately understand. Often as you read you will find that many questions are answered by the text itself. The questions to which you cannot find answers become the starting points for more in-depth study using commentaries or other reference tools.

Follow a different plan for reading the New Testament. Read one book at a time repetitiously for a month or more. This will help you to retain what is in the New Testament and not always have to depend on a concordance to find things.

If you want to try this, begin with a short book, such as 1 John, and read it through in one sitting every day for 30 days. At the end of that time, you will know what is in the book. Write on index cards the major theme of each chapter. By referring to the cards as you do your daily reading, you will begin to remember the content of each chapter. In fact, you will develop a visual perception of the book in your mind.

Divide longer books into short sections and read each section daily for 30 days. For example, the gospel of John contains 21 chapters. Divide it into 3 sections of 7 chapters. At the end of 90 days, you will finish John. For variety, alternate short and long books, and in less than 3 years you will have finished the entire New Testament—as you will really know it!

STEP 2—Interpreting. In Acts 8:30, Philip asked the Ethiopian eunuch, “Do you understand what you are reading?” Or put another way, “What does the Bible mean by what it says?” It is not enough to read the text and jump directly to the application; we must first determine what it means, otherwise the application may be incorrect.

As you read Scripture, always keep in mind one simple question: “What does this mean?” To answer that question requires the use of the most basic principle of interpretation, called the analogy of faith, which tells the reader to “interpret the Bible with the Bible.” Letting the Holy Spirit be your teacher (1 John 2:27), search the Scripture He has authored, using cross-references, comparative passages, concordances, indexes, and other helps. For those passages that yet remain unclear, consult your pastor or godly men who have written in that particular area.

Errors to Avoid – As you interpret Scripture, several common errors should be avoided.

Do not draw any conclusions at the price of proper interpretation. That is, do not make the Bible say what you want it to say, but rather let it say what God intended when He wrote it.

Avoid superficial interpretation. You have heard people say, “To me, this passage means,” or “I feel it is saying. . . .” The first step in interpreting the Bible is to recognize the four gaps we have to bridge: language, culture, geography, and history (see below).

Do not spiritualize the passage. Interpret and understand the passage in its normal, literal, historical, grammatical sense, just like you would understand any other piece of literature you were reading today.

Gaps to Bridge – The books of the Bible were written many centuries ago.

For us to understand today what God was communicating then, there are several gaps that need to be bridged: the language gap, the cultural gap, the geographical gap, and the historical gap. Proper interpretation, therefore, takes time and disciplined effort.

Language. The Bible was originally written in Greek, Hebrew, and Aramaic. Often, understanding the meaning of a word or phrase in the original language can be the key to correctly interpreting a passage of Scripture.

Culture. The culture gap can be tricky. Some people try to use cultural differences to explain away the more difficult biblical commands. Realize that Scripture must first be viewed in the context of the culture in which it was written. Without an understanding of first-century Jewish culture, it is difficult to understand the gospel. Acts and the epistles must be read in light of the Greek and Roman cultures.

Geography. A third gap that needs to be closed is the geography gap. Biblical geography make the Bible come alive. A good Bible atlas is an invaluable reference tool that can help you comprehend the geography of the Holy Land.

History. We must also bridge the history gap. Unlike the scriptures of most other world religions, the Bible contains the records of actual historical persons and events. An understanding of Bible history will help us place the people and events in it in their proper historical perspective. A good Bible dictionary or Bible encyclopedia is useful here, as are basic historical studies.

Principles to Understand

Four principles should guide us as we interpret the Bible: literal, historical, grammatical, and synthesis.

The Literal Principle. Scripture should be understood in its literal, normal, and natural sense. While the Bible does contain figures of speech and symbols, they were intended to convey literal truth. In general, however, the Bible speaks in literal terms, and we must allow it to speak for itself.

The Historical Principle. This means that we interpret in its historical context. We must ask what the text meant to the people to whom it was first written. In this way we can develop a proper contextual understanding of the original intent of Scripture.

The Grammatical Principle. This requires that we understand the basic grammatical structure of each sentence in the original language. To whom do the pronouns refer? What is the tense of the main verb? You will find that when you ask some simple questions like those, the meaning of the text immediately becomes clearer.

The Synthesis Principle. This is what the Reformers called the analogia scriptura. It means that the Bible does not contradict itself. If we arrive at an interpretation of a passage that contradicts a truth taught elsewhere in the Scriptures, our interpretation cannot be correct. Scripture must be compared with Scripture to discover its full meaning.

STEP 3—Evaluating. You have been reading and asking the question, “What does the Bible say?” Then you have interpreted, asking the question, “What does the Bible mean?” Now it is time to consult others to insure that you have the proper interpretation. Remember, the Bible will never contradict itself.

Read Bible introductions, commentaries, and background books which will enrich your thinking through that illumination which God has given to other men and to you through their books. In your evaluation, be a true seeker. Be one who accepts the truth of God’s Word even though it may cause you to change what you always have believed, or cause you to alter your life pattern.

STEP 4—Applying. The next question is: “How does God’s truth penetrate and change my own life?” Studying Scripture without allowing it to penetrate to the depths of your soul would be like preparing a banquet without eating it. The bottom-line question to ask is, “How do the divine truths and principles contained in any passage apply to me in terms of my attitude and actions?”

Jesus made this promise to those who would carry their personal Bible study through to this point: “If you know these things, blessed are you if you do them” (John 13:17).

Having read and interpreted the Bible, you should have a basic understanding of what the Bible says, and what it means by what it says. But studying the Bible does not stop there. The ultimate goal should be to let it speak to you and enable you to grow spiritually. That requires personal application.

Bible study is not complete until we ask ourselves, “What does this mean for my life and how can I practically apply it?” We must take the knowledge we have gained from our reading and interpretation and draw out the practical principles that apply to our personal lives.

If there is a command to be obeyed, we obey it. If there is a promise to be embraced, we claim it. If there is a warning to be followed, we heed it. This is the ultimate step: we submit to Scripture and let it transform our lives. If you skip this step, you will never enjoy your Bible study and the Bible will never change your life.

STEP 5—Correlating. This last stage connects the doctrine you have learned in a particular passage or book with divine truths and principles taught elsewhere in the Bible to form the big picture. Always keep in mind that the Bible is one book in 66 parts, and it contains a number of truths and principles, taught over and over again in a variety of ways and circumstances. By correlating and cross-referencing, you will begin to build a sound doctrinal foundation by which to live.

What Now?

The psalmist said, “Blessed is the man who walks not in the counsel of the ungodly, nor stands in the path of sinners, nor sits in the seat of the scornful; But his delight is in the law of the Lord, and in His law he meditates day and night” (Ps. 1:1,2).

It is not enough just to study the Bible. We must meditate upon it. In a very real sense we are giving our brain a bath; we are washing it in the purifying solution of God’s Word.

“This Book of the Law shall not depart from your mouth, but you shall meditate in it day and night, that you may observe to do according to all that is written in it. For then you will make your way prosperous, and then you will have good success” (Joshua 1:8).

Here is the spring where waters flow,

To quench our heat of sin:

Here is the tree where truth doth grow,

To lead our lives therein:

Here is the judge that stints the strife,

When men’s devices fail:

Here is the bread that feeds the life,

That death cannot assail.

The tidings of salvation dear,

Comes to our ears from hence:

The fortress of our faith is here,

And shield of our defense.

Then be not like the swine that hath

A pearl at his desire,

And takes more pleasure from the trough

And wallowing in the mire.

Read not this book in any case,

But with a single eye:

Read not but first desire God’s grace,

To understand thereby.

Pray still in faith with this respect,

To bear good fruit therein,

That knowledge may bring this effect,

To mortify thy sin.

Then happy you shall be in all your life,

What so to you befalls:

Yes, double happy you shall be,

When God by death you calls.

(From the first Bible printed in Scotland—1576)

Adapted from the “Introduction” to John MacArthur. ESV MacArthur Study Bible. Wheaton: Crossway Books, 2010.

About the Author: Dr. John MacArthur is the pastor-teacher of Grace Community Church in Sun Valley, California. Grace Church has grown from 450 members in 1969, when MacArthur accepted the pastorate, to over 12,000 today. He is also the president of The Master’s College and Seminary in Newhall, California, a prolific author of more than two dozen books, and the speaker on the worldwide radio broadcast, Grace to You, heard over 700 times daily–every half hour, day and night, somewhere around the world. 

The primary emphasis of MacArthur’s ministry has always been the expository preaching and teaching of God’s Word through a verse-by-verse exposition of the Scripture. His studies pay particular attention to the historical and grammatical aspects of each biblical passage. MacArthur’s recently published book, How to Get the Most from God’s Word, released in conjunction with The MacArthur Study Bible, is designed to fill what he sees as “an increased hunger for the meat of the Word.” He assures the reader that the Bible is trustworthy and that an understanding of Scripture is available to everyone. He then provides guidance on how to study the Bible and how to discern the meaning of Scripture for oneself. Dr. MacArthur explains that the book and the Study Bible have been “in the works for 30 years…the product of 32 hours a week, 52 weeks a year…dedicated to the study of God’s Word.” He asserts that “God’s Word is the only thing that satisfies my appetite, but it also arouses an even deeper hunger for more.”

Among MacArthur’s other books are The MacArthur New Testament Commentary series, The Gospel According to Jesus, The Master’s Plan for the Church, Saved Without a Doubt, The Glory of Heaven, Lord Teach Me to Pray, Unleashing God’s Word in Your Life, Safe in the Arms of God, The Second Coming, Why One Way?, and Truth for Today, and Slave: The Hidden Truth About Your Identity in Christ. His books have been translated into Chinese, Czechoslovakian, French, Finnish, Hungarian, Korean, Polish, Romanian, Spanish, and several Indian languages. Though occasionally viewed by some groups as a controversial figure for strong critiques of freudian psychology, trends in the modern charismatic movement as well as the self-esteem movement, John MacArthur is seen by many as a champion of correcting many of the ills of evangelical Christianity. He is also a champion of helping believers grow stronger in their relationship with God through the committed study of the Word and personal commitment to the local church.
MacArthur spent his first two years of college at Bob Jones University, completed his undergraduate work at Los Angeles Pacific College, and studied for the ministry at Talbot Theological Seminary. John and his wife, Patricia, live in Southern California. They have four grown children — Matt, Marcy, Mark, and Melinda–and eight grandchildren.

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A Plan for Reading the Bible Chronologically in a Year

January

(1) Genesis 1-3; (2) Genesis 4-7;( 3) Genesis 8-11; (4) Job 1-5; (5) Job 6-9; (6) Job 10-13; (7) Job 14-16; (8) Job 17-20; (9) Job 21-23; (10) Job 24-28; (11) Job 29-31; (12) Job 32-34; (13) Job 35-37; (14) Job 38-39; (15) Job 40-42; (16) Genesis 12-15; (17) Genesis 16-18; (18) Genesis 19-21; (19) Genesis 22-24; (20) Genesis 25-26; (21) Genesis 27-29; (22) Genesis 30-31; (23) Genesis 32-34; (24) Genesis 35-37; (25) Genesis 38-40; (26) Genesis 41-42; (27) Genesis 43-45; (28) Genesis 46-47; (29) Genesis 48-50; (30) Exodus 1-3; 31) Exodus 4-6

 February

(1) Exodus 7-9; (2) Exodus 10-12; (3) Exodus 13-15; (4) Exodus 16-18; (5) Exodus 19-21; (6) Exodus 22-24; (7) Exodus 25-27; (8) Exodus 28-29; (9) Exodus 30-32; (10) Exodus 33-35; (11) Exodus 36-38; (12) Exodus 39-40; (13) Leviticus 1-4; (14) Leviticus 5-7; (15) Leviticus 8-10; (16) Leviticus 11-13; (17) Leviticus 14-15; (18) Leviticus 16-18; (19) Leviticus 19-21; (20) Leviticus 22-23; (21) Leviticus 24-25; (22) Leviticus 26-27; (23) Numbers 1-2; (24) Numbers 3-4; (25) Numbers 5-6; (26) Numbers 7; (27) Numbers 8-10; (28) Numbers 11-13.

 March

(1) Numbers 14-15; Psalms 90; (2) Numbers 16-17; (3) Numbers 18-20; (4) Numbers 21-22; (5) Numbers 23-25; (6) Numbers 26-27; (7) Numbers 28-30; (8) Numbers 31-32; (9) Numbers 33-34; (10) Numbers 35-36; (11) Deuteronomy 1-2; (12) Deuteronomy 3-4; (13) Deuteronomy 5-7; (14) Deuteronomy 8-10; (15) Deuteronomy 11-13; (16) Deuteronomy 14-16; (17) Deuteronomy 17-20; (18) Deuteronomy 21-23; (19) Deuteronomy 24-27; (20) Deuteronomy 28-29; (21) Deuteronomy 30-31; (22) Deuteronomy 32-34; Psalms 91; (23) Joshua 1-4; (24) Joshua 5-8; (25) Joshua 9-11; (26) Joshua 12-15; (27) Joshua 16-18; (28) Joshua 19-21; (29) Joshua 22-24; (30) Judges 1-2; (31) Judges 3-5.

 April

1) Judges 6-7; 2) Judges 8-9; 3) Judges 10-12; 4) Judges 13-15; 5) Judges 16-18; 6) Judges 19-21; 7) Ruth; 8) 1 Samuel 1-3; 9) 1 Samuel 4-8; 10) 1 Samuel 9-12; 11) 1 Samuel 13-14; 12) 1 Samuel 15-17; 13) 1 Samuel 18-20; Psalms 11; Psalms 59; 14) 1 Samuel 21-24; 15) Psalms 7; Psalms 27; Psalms 31; Psalms 34; Psalms 52; 16) Psalms 56; Psalms 120; Psalms 140-142; 17) 1 Samuel 25-27; 18) Psalms 17; Psalms 35; Psalms 54; Psalms 63; 19) 1 Samuel 28-31; Psalms 18; 20) Psalms 121; Psalms 123-125; Psalms 128-130; 21) 2 Samuel 1-4; 22) Psalms 6; Psalms 8-10; Psalms 14; Psalms 16; Psalms 19; Psalms 21; 23) 1 Chronicles 1-2; 24) Psalms 43-45; Psalms 49; Psalms 84-85; Psalms 87; 25) 1 Chronicles 3-5; 26) Psalms 73; Psalms 77-78; 27) 1 Chronicles 6; 28) Psalms 81; Psalms 88; Psalms 92-93; 29) 1 Chronicles 7-10; 30) Psalms 102-104.

 May

1) 2 Samuel 5:1-10; 1 Chronicles 11-12; 2) Psalms 133; 3) Psalms 106-107; 4) 2 Samuel 5:11-6:23; 1 Chronicles 13-16; 5) Psalms 1-2; Psalms 15; Psalms 22-24; Psalms 47; Psalms 68; 6) Psalms 89; Psalms 96; Psalms 100; Psalms 101; Psalms 105; Psalms 132; 7) 2 Samuel 7; 1 Chronicles 17; 8) Psalms 25; Psalms 29; Psalms 33; Psalms 36; Psalms 39; 9) 2 Samuel 8-9; 1 Chronicles 18; 10) Psalms 50; Psalms 53; Psalms 60; Psalms 75; 11) 2 Samuel 10; 1 Chronicles 19; Psalms 20; 12) Psalms 65-67; Psalms 69-70; 13) 2 Samuel 11-12; 1 Chronicles 20; 14) Psalms 32; Psalms 51; Psalms 86; Psalms 122; 15) 2 Samuel 13-15; 16) Psalms 3-4; Psalms 12-13; Psalms 28; Psalms 55; 17) 2 Samuel 16-18; 18) Psalms 26; Psalms 40; Psalms 58; Psalms 61-62; Psalms 64; 19) 2 Samuel 19-21; 20) Psalms 5; Psalms 38; Psalms 41-42; 21) 2 Samuel 22-23; Psalms 57; 22) Psalms 95; Psalms 97-99; 23) 2 Samuel 24; 1 Chronicles 21-22; Psalms 30; 24) Psalms 108-110; 25) 1 Chronicles 23-25; 26) Psalms 131; Psalms 138-139; Psalms 143-145; 27) 1 Chronicles 26-29; Psalms 127; 28) Psalms 111-118; 29) 1 Kings 1-2; Psalms 37; Psalms 71; Psalms 94; 30) Psalms 119:1-88; 31) 1 Kings 3-4; 2 Chronicles 1; Psalms 72.

 June

1) Psalms 119:89-176; 2) Song of Solomon; 3) Proverbs 1-3; 4) Proverbs 4-6; 5) Proverbs 7-9; 6) Proverbs 10-12; 7) Proverbs 13-15; 8) Proverbs 16-18; 9) Proverbs 19-21; 10) Proverbs 22-24; 11) 1 Kings 5-6; 2 Chronicles 2-3; 12) 1 Kings 7; 2 Chronicles 4; 13) 1 Kings 8; 2 Chronicles 5; 14) 2 Chronicles 6-7; Psalms 136; 15) Psalms 134; Psalms 146-150; 16) 1 Kings 9; 2 Chronicles 8; 17) Proverbs 25-26; 18) Proverbs 27-29; 19) Ecclesiastes 1-6; 20) Ecclesiastes 7-12; 21) 1 Kings 10-11; 2 Chronicles 9; 22) Proverbs 30-31; 23) 1 Kings 12-14; 24) 2 Chronicles 10-12; 25) 1 Kings 15:1-24; 2 Chronicles 13-16; 26) 1 Kings 15:25-16:34; 2 Chronicles 17; 27) 1 Kings 17-19; 28) 1 Kings 20-21; 29) 1 Kings 22; 2 Chronicles 18; 30) 2 Chronicles 19-23.

 July

1) Obadiah; Psalms 82-83; 2) 2 Kings 1-4; 3) 2 Kings 5-8; 4) 2 Kings 9-11; 5) 2 Kings 12-13; 2 Chronicles 24; 6) 2 Kings 14; 2 Chronicles 25; 7) Jonah; 8) 2 Kings 15; 2 Chronicles 26; 9) Isaiah 1-4; 10) Isaiah 5-8; 11) Amos 1-5; 12) Amos 6-9; 13) 2 Chronicles 27; Isaiah 9-12; 14) Micah; 15) 2 Chronicles 28; 2 Kings 16-17; 16) Isaiah 13-17; 17) Isaiah 18-22; 18) Isaiah 23-27; 19) 2 Kings 18:1-8; 2 Chronicles 29-31; Psalms 48; 20) Hosea 1-7; 21) Hosea 8-14; 22) Isaiah 28-30; 23) Isaiah 31-34; 24) Isaiah 35-36; 25) Isaiah 37-39; Psalms 76; 26) Isaiah 40-43; 27) Isaiah 44-48; 28) 2 Kings 18:9-19:37; Psalms 46; Psalms 80; Psalms 135; 29) Isaiah 49-53; 30) Isaiah 54-58; 31) Isaiah 59-63.

 August

(1) Isaiah 64-66; (2) 2 Kings 20-21; (3) 2 Chronicles 32-33; (4) Nahum; (5) 2 Kings 22-23; 2 Chronicles 34-35; (6) Zephaniah; (7) Jeremiah 1-3; (8) Jeremiah 4-6; (9) Jeremiah 7-9; (10) Jeremiah 10-13; (11) Jeremiah 14-17; (12) Jeremiah 18-22; (13) Jeremiah 23-25; (14) Jeremiah 26-29; (15) Jeremiah 30-31; (16) Jeremiah 32-34; (17) Jeremiah 35-37; (18) Jeremiah 38-40; Psalms 74; Psalms 79; (19) 2 Kings 24-25; 2 Chronicles 36; (20) Habakkuk; (21) Jeremiah 41-45; (22) Jeremiah 46-48; (23) Jeremiah 49-50; (24) Jeremiah 51-52; (25) Lamentations 1:1-3:36; (26) Lamentations 3:37-5:22; (27) Ezekiel 1-4; (28) Ezekiel 5-8; (29) Ezekiel 9-12; (30) Ezekiel 13-15; (31) Ezekiel 16-17.

 September

(1) Ezekiel 18-19; (2) Ezekiel 20-21; (3) Ezekiel 22-23; (4) Ezekiel 24-27; (5) Ezekiel 28-31; (6) Ezekiel 32-34; (7) Ezekiel 35-37; (8) Ezekiel 38-39; (9) Ezekiel 40-41; (10) Ezekiel 42-43; (11) Ezekiel 44-45; (12) Ezekiel 46-48; (13) Joel; (14) Daniel 1-3; (15) Daniel 4-6; (16) Daniel 7-9; (17) Daniel 10-12; (18) Ezra 1-3; (19) Ezra 4-6; Psalms 137; (20) Haggai; (21) Zechariah 1-7; (22) Zechariah 8-14; (23) Esther 1-5; (24) Esther 6-10; (25) Ezra 7-10; (26) Nehemiah 1-5; (27) Nehemiah 6-7; (28) Nehemiah 8-10; (29) Nehemiah 11-13; Psalms 126; (30) Malachi.

 October

(1) Luke 1; John 1:1-14; (2) Matthew 1; Luke 2:1-38; (3) Matthew 2; Luke 2:39-52; (4) Matthew 3; Mark 1; Luke 3; (5) Matthew 4; Luke 4-5; John 1:15-51; (6) John 2-4; (7) Mark 2; (8) John 5; (9) Matthew 12:1-21; Mark 3; Luke 6; (10) Matthew 5-7; (11) Matthew 8:1-13; Luke 7; (12) Matthew 11; (13) Matthew 12:22-50; Luke 11; (14) Matthew 13; Luke 8; (15) Matthew 8:14-34; Mark 4-5; (16) Matthew 9-10; (17) Matthew 14; Mark 6; Luke 9:1-17; (18) John 6; (19) Matthew 15; Mark 7; (20) Matthew 16; Mark 8; Luke 9:18-27; (21) Matthew 17; Mark 9; Luke 9:28-62; (22) Matthew 18; (23) John 7-8; (24) John 9:1-10:21; (25) Luke 10-11; John 10:22-42; (26) Luke 12-13; (27) Luke 14-15; (28) Luke 16-17:10; (29) John 11; (30) Luke 17:11-18:14; (31) Matthew 19; Mark 10.

 November

(1) Matthew 20-21; (2) Luke 18:15-19:48; (3) Mark 11; John 12; (4) Matthew 22; Mark 12; (5) Matthew 23; Luke 20-21; (6) Mark 13; (7) Matthew 24; (8) Matthew 25; (9) Matthew 26; Mark 14; (10) Luke 22; John 13; (11) John 14-17; (12) Matthew 27; Mark 15; (13) Luke 23; John 18-19; (14) Matthew 28; Mark 16; (15) Luke 24; John 20-21; (16) Acts 1-3; (17) Acts 4-6; (18) Acts 7-8; (19) Acts 9-10; (20) Acts 11-12; (21) Acts 13-14; (22) James; (23) Acts 15-16; (24) Galatians 1-3; (25) Galatians 4-6; (26) Acts 17-18:18; (27) 1 Thessalonians; 2 Thessalonians; (28) Acts 18:19-19:41; (29) 1 Corinthians 1-4; (30) 1 Corinthians 5-8.

 December

(1) 1 Corinthians 9-11; (2) 1 Corinthians 12-14; (3) 1 Corinthians 15-16; (4) 2 Corinthians 1-4; (5) 2 Corinthians 5-9; (6) 2 Corinthians 10-13; (7) Acts 20:1-3; Romans 1-3; (8) Romans 4-7; (9) Romans 8-10; (10) Romans 11-13; (11) Romans 14-16; (12) Acts 20:4-23:35; (13) Acts 24-26; (14) Acts 27-28; (15) Colossians; Philemon; (16) Ephesians; (17) Philippians; (18) 1 Timothy; (19) Titus; (20) 1 Peter; (21) Hebrews 1-6; (22) Hebrews 7-10; (23) Hebrews 11-13; (24) 2 Timothy; (25) 2 Peter; Jude; (26) 1 John; (27) 2 John; 3 John; (28) Revelation 1-5; (29) Revelation 6-11; (30) Revelation 12-18; (31) Revelation 19-22.

 
 

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