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Category Archives: Charts

Charts are especially helpful for those who are visually oriented. Feel free to use these charts in any way that may be helpful to you. Please always refer to the originator of each chart – whether person, book, etc.

God-Centered “Mission” Vs. Man-centered “Missions”: Chart by Bradford Hunter

Categories God-Centered Mission Man-Centered-Missions
The Goal The Chief purpose of the Church’s Mission is to bring glory to God. Glory is brought to God when every nation, tribe, and tongue find their delight in worshipping God.The salvation of souls is certainly a goal in mission. When we look at souls, however, we desire not only that they are saved from Hell, but saved for Heaven. In man-centered missions’ the salvation of the lost is seen as the main purpose of missions. Men and Women are dying without Christ, and so we must bring them the good news.
What drives us? “People deserve to be damned, but Jesus, the suffering Lamb of God, deserves the reward of His suffering” (John Piper, Let The Nations Be Glad, p. 39). We go out because we love Christ, and we desire that others would love Him too (Of course we are also to desire that the lost would be saved and that they find true fulfillment in God). Man deserves Hell. It is often difficult to develop a love for the lost world, as the lost are so unlovely. To love the sinner who hates God and Christians is very difficult.
Worship Worship of the Triune God is both the fuel and the goal of missions. Missions exist because worship does not. In Heaven there will be no need for missions, but we will be worshipping God for eternity (Rev. 5:8-14). In man-centered missions, worship is often seen as only a secondary activity, not as important as missions.
Missions? Or Mission? There is only ONE mission of the Church: to bring glory to God by proclaiming the Gospel and reaping the harvest of souls which will worship and delight in God forever. There are numerous missions’ (plural), because there are numerous souls to save.
Bricks or Cathedrals? The big-picture’ bricklayer constantly envisions the cathedral that he has a privilege to play a part in building. So the God-centered missionary envisions the Kingdom of God which he is engaged in building. The little-picture’ bricklayer only sees the bricks and the mortar. So it is with the man-centered missionary, who when he is rejected or encounters trials or failures, cannot look beyond to see the hand of God in it all.
Work with or for Christ We are not working for Christ as much as we are working with Christ (Matthew 28:20b) In this view, we focus on our job, what we can, focus on our job, what we can do for Christ.
Human Worth Human worth is not diminished by being God-centered. Instead, it is established. That is, when we focus on God who alone has worth in Himself, and we understand that we are created in His image, this brings us great worth. Man has no worth in and of himself, and being man-centered in one’s approach to anything is ultimately futile.
 Humility Vs. Pride Though he thanks God for the opportunity to serve Him and desires to accomplish great things for God, the God-centered missionary knows that he is replaceable. He is a tool in God’s hand, and God can choose to discard him when God pleases. This brings about humility. Again, the man-centered missionary is on his own mission or various missions, and without him the venture would fall apart. The tendency is toward a Lone Ranger’ mentality. This fosters pride.
Prayer Colossians 4:2-4. Only God can open man’s hearts, so we must ever be in prayer when we are engaged in mission work. Methods are important, but only after you pray and get the message straight. Man is pursued with any method or technique that will get him to listen, to ‘open his heart’. The problem, only God can open man’s heart.Prayer takes a back seat so the methods, and the message is often compromised.
 Evangelism We focus on our faithfulness to the message, allowing God to change hearts (1 Cor. 3:5-8). We have no reason to boast for our successes’ except to boast in the Lord. Those who reject the Gospel are not rejecting us, but God.A side note: though we must allow the Gospel to be offensive (the innocent God-man dying for wretched sinners), we must not add our own offensiveness to the mix. The focus is on persuasion & results, because anyone’s heart can be opened ‘if we have the right key’.  We are seen as failures if the person doesn’t choose Christ. Method and delivery are exalted above content. Offensive doctrines like ‘eternal judgment’ and ‘total depravity’ are avoided, so as not to drive away seekers. (Obviously there is no true gospel where sin and judgment aren’t preached).
 Success & Failure  Success is guaranteed, because it is God who will build the church.(1 Cor. 3:4-6, Matt. 16:18)This is not to say that man has no role in God’s mission. Man is used as an instrument in the hands of God.Isaiah 18:6; 2 Corinthians 4:7)Even our failures are used by God as successes (Genesis 50:20; Romans 11:33-36) Success is questionable, since in missions it is seen as man’s mission, and humans make mistakes.With a man-centered viewpoint, when we succeed, we tend to become prideful, and when we fail, we tend to get defeated.
How Great a Sacrifice?  Though to the word it appears as if you have made a great sacrifice, when we focus on the sacrifice that Christ paid for us and the benefits that He gave to us, our sacrifice is minimal (See Matthew 13:44-46). With the wrong perspective, the sacrifice becomes unbearable, and when too much rejection, and too much hardship comes, the man-centered missionary is more likely to give up.
 

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10 Distinctions Between the Rapture and the Second Coming of Christ

Rapture 1 

THE RAPTURE

THE SECOND COMING

A “stealth” event; Christ witnessed by believers only (1 Thessalonians 4:17)

A public event, Christ witnessed by everyone (Revelation 1:7)

Christ comes for His bride to take her to heaven (John 14:1-3)

Christ returns with His bride to set up His 1,000 year Kingdom (Revelation 19:11-16)

Occurs prior to the beginning of the Tribulation (Rev. 3:10; 1 Thess. 5:9)

Occurs at the end of the Tribulation (Matthew 24:29-35)

Ushers in a time of great distress on earth (Matthew 24:15-28)

Ushers in a time of great peace on earth (Isaiah 2:6; 19:21, 23-25)

Believers are rescued from the wrath of God (Revelation 3:10)

Believers rule with Christ (Revelation 20:4)

Church age believers receive their glorified bodies (1 Corinthians 15:50-54)

OT saints receive their glorified bodies (Isaiah 26:19-21)

Christ comes in the air (1 Thess. 4:14-17)

Christ comes to the earth

(Revelation 19:11-16)

Imminent, could happen at any time

At least seven years away (Daniel 9:26-29)

No signs precede it

(Titus 2:13)

Many signs precede it, including the Tribulation (Matthew 24:3-35)

A time for great joy for believers

(1 Thessalonians 2:19-20)

A time of great mourning for unbelievers

(Revelation 1:7)

Source: David Jeremiah Study Bible. Nashville, TN.: Worthy Publishing, 2013, p. 1841.

 

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THE POWER OF DISCIPLESHIP GROUPS FOR MULTIPLYING DISCIPLES

*EVANGELISTIC ADDITION VS. DISCIPLEMAKING MULTIPLICATION

crowd

YEAR EVANGELIST DISCIPLER D-GROUP OF 4
1 365 2 3
2 730 4 9
3 1,095 8 27
4 1,460 16 81
5 1,825 32 243
6 2,190 64 729
7 2,555 128 2,187
8 2,920 256 6,561
9 3,285 512 19,683
10 3,650 1,024 59,049
11 4,015 2,048 177,147
12 4,380 4,096 531,441
13 4,745 8,192 1,594,323
14 5,110 16,384 4,782,969
15 5,475 32,768 14,348,907
16 5,840 65,536 43,046,721

**Robby Gallaty on Discipleship Multiplication in D-Groups

God has always been interested in reproduction. In fact, His first command to Adam and Eve in the Garden was not to be spiritual, productive, or upstanding citizens of earth. Rather, it was to “be fruitful and multiply.” (Genesis 1:28). What God commanded the first humans to do physically is what Jesus commanded the first believers to do spiritually. The goal of every *D-Group is for the mentee, the one being discipled, to become a mentor; to multiply–make other disciples [*A D-Group is a closed group of 3-5 members of the same-sex consisting of believers who desire a deeper walk with Christ via intimate and accountable relationships resulting in community and multiplication of more disciples].

In essence, the D-Group is designed for the player to become a coach. If it is not discussed early on, members in the group will adopt a consumer mentality, with a short-sighted, self-serving focus. The heart of discipleship, as Christ modeled and instituted it, is that you are not learning only for yourself. You are learning for the person whom you will mentor in following Him.

The Great Commission is designed to be a team effort. Instead of the pastors/leaders/Sunday school teachers/deacons performing all the duties of ministry in the church, the saints are equipped to carry out the work. The ministers cannot carry out the command alone, as Paul clearly stated: “And he gave the apostles, the prophets, the evangelists, the shepherds and teachers, to equip the saints for the work of ministry” (Ephesians 4:11-12).

Greg Ogden, in his book Discipleship Essentials, expounds this point by graphically illustrating the contrast between someone personally seeing one person come to the Lord every day for a year, as compared to investing in the same two people for an entire year (see chart above). The evangelist hits the streets every day with the goal of sharing the gospel with as many people as needed to see God save one person. In contrast, the disciple-maker walks two people through a year of intensive discipleship.

The slow-moving discipleship process creeps forward with only four people being impacted in two years, compared to 730 converts through the solitary work of the busy evangelist. However, this radically changes with the passing of time. After sixteen years of the same activity, the evangelist would have seen almost 6,000 people come to faith in Christ, while the disciple would have impacted 65,536 people. Every person on the planet would be reached multiple times over after thirty years. It is a ministry shift from a strategy of addition, where the clergy performs the ministerial duties, to one of multiplication, where believers are expected and equipped to personally participate in the Great Commission.

Multiplication–not addition–is Jesus’ plan for reaching the world with gospel. And multiplication is the purpose of the D-Group. If the body of Christ would accept this plan, embrace it, and faithfulness obey it, then the Great Commission would be accomplished.

Nothing Grows under a Banyan Tree

The banyan is a massive tree that develops secondary trunks to support its enormous branches. A full-grown banyan tree can cover an entire acre. The tree provides shade and shelter for many animals with its branches, but nothing is able to grow under its dense foliage. Therefore, the earth beneath is barren.

A banana tree is exactly the opposite. Within six months, small shoots sprout from the ground. Six months later, another set of shoots spring up from the earth to join the others, which are now six months old. At about eighteen months, bananas burst forth from the main trunk of the tree. Humans, birds, and many other creatures benefit from its fruit before it dies. Every six months, the cycle is reproduced, with sprouts forming, fruit bearing, and shoots dying. The end result is a forest of banana trees.

These contrasting trees graphically illustrate a vital discipleship truth. Many people utilize a banyan style of leadership. Mitsuo Fukuda explained, “Banyan-style leaders have a tremendous ministry, but have difficulty finding a successor, because they do not generate leaders, only followers. It’s possible to grow followers in a relatively short space of time, and that’s a useful result on its own. But when the leader goes away, you are left only with a heavily dependent group of people, programmed with a list of instructions” (Mitsuo Fukuda, Upward, Outward, Inward: Passing on the Baton of Discipleship. Gloucester, UK: Wide Margin Books, 2010, p. 100).

Discipleship is about shoots and sprouts. These new sprouts are never a threat to the banana tree, for they ensure growth. In fact, they are expected. The goal of a D-Group is for the mentee to become a mentor, for the player to become a coach. Unless that happens, the group never progresses beyond a small group Bible study.

**Source: Chart is adapted from Greg Ogden, Discipleship Essentials: A Guide to Building Your Life in Christ (Downers Grove: IL.: IVP, 2007), 12. Article adapted from Robby Gallaty. Growing Up: How To Be A Disciple Who Makes Disciples. (Bloomington, IN.: CrossBooks, 2013), pp. 13-16. Thanks to Robby Gallaty for permission to print this article.

 

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Emergency Numbers in The Bible

“My presence will go with you, and I will give you rest.” – Exodus 33:14b

dark sunset at the beach

When in SORROW, call John 14

When people FAIL you, call Psalm 27

When you have SINNED, call Psalm 51

When you WORRY, call Matthew 6:19-34

When you are in DANGER, call Psalm 91

When God seems FAR AWAY, call Psalm 139

When your FAITH needs stirring, call Hebrews 11

When you are LONELY and FEARFUL, call Psalm 23

When you grow BITTER and CRITICAL, call 1 Corinthians 13

When you feel DOWN and OUT, call Romans 8:18-39

When you want REST and PEACE, call Matthew 11:25-30

When the WORLD seems BIGGER than God, call Psalm 90

When you want Christian ASSURANCE, call Romans 8:1-30

When you leave home for LABOR or TRAVEL, call Psalm 121

When your PRAYERS grow narrow or SELFISH, call Psalm 67

When you want COURAGE for a task, call Joshua 1

When you think of INVESTMENTS and RETURNS, call Mark 10

How to get along with DIFFICULT people, call Romans 12

For great INVENTION/OPPORTUNITY, call Isaiah 55

For Paul’s secret to HAPPINESS, call Colossians 3:12-17

For a SUMMARY OF CHRISTIANITY, call 1 Corinthians 5:15-19

If you are DEPRESSED, call Psalm 27

If you want to be FRUITFUL, call John 15

If your FINANCIALLY BROKE, call Psalm 37

If your are LOSING CONFIDENCE in PEOPLE, call 1 Corinthians 13

If people seem UNKIND, call John 15

If your are DISCOURAGED about your WORK, call Psalm 126

If you find the world growing SMALL, and you GREAT, call Psalm 19

 

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Finding Jesus in 2 Corinthians

Reading The Bible Through The Jesus Lens in the Book of 2 Corinthians

From Biblical Book to Biblical Hook

How To Read The Bible Through the Jesus Lens IMage

Chart adapted from *Dr. Michael Williams Book

Title for 2 Corinthians

2 Corinthians: Theme

2 Corinthians 2:17

“Self-Giving”

God directs Paul to explain and vindicate his apostolic authority while encouraging the generosity of the Corinthian church.

“Unlike so many, we do not peddle the word of God for profit. On the contrary, in Christ we speak before God with sincerity, as those sent from God.”

Christ-Focus in 2 Corinthians

Implications from 2 Corinthians

Hooks from 2 Corinthians

 Jesus gave Himself completely for the welfare of His people.

 For you know the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, that though He was rich, yet for your sake He became poor, so that you by His poverty might become rich.

 – 2 Corinthians 8:9

 God will provide for our needs as we give ourselves to others.

 The point is this: whoever sows sparingly will also reap sparingly, and whoever sows bountifully will also reap bountifully.

 Each one must give as he has decided in his heart, not reluctantly or under compulsion, for God loves a cheerful giver.

 And God is able to make all grace abound to you, so that having all sufficiency in all things at all times, you may abound in every good work.

As it is written, “He has distributed freely, he has given to the poor; his righteousness endures forever.”

 – 2 Corinthians 9:6-11

 Is it really better to give than to receive?

 What if giving involves giving up comfort, safety, or even your life? Why would anyone give like that?

 Is it possible for you to give any more than you have already received?

 What have you already received from God?

About the Author:

Michael James Williams image

Michael James Williams in his own words: “After my conversion in the U. S. Navy (in a submarine beneath the North Atlantic!), I entered Columbia Bible College, where I received a B.A. (1985). This was followed by an M.A. in Religion at Westminster Theological Seminary (1987) and a Ph.D. in Biblical Studies at the University of Pennsylvania (1999). In 2000, I was ordained in the Christian Reformed Church, and since 1995 have been teaching at Calvin Theological Seminary. I have also taught courses at Westminster Theological Seminary, the University of Pennsylvania, and brief stints in Limuru, Kenya; Donetsk, Ukraine; and Warsaw, Poland. In addition to articles on Old Testament topics in various reference works and academic journals, and contributing to and editing Mishneh Todah: Studies in Deuteronomy and Its Cultural Environment in Honor of Jeffrey H. Tigay (2009); I have authored Deception in Genesis: A Comprehensive Analysis of a Unique Biblical Phenomenon (2001); The Prophet and His Message: Reading Old Testament Prophecy Today (2003); and, most recently, How to Read the Bible through the Jesus Lens: A Guide to Christ-Focused Reading of Scripture. Grand Rapids, Zondervan (2012). My amazing wife, Dawn, and I enjoy hiking and all things outdoors.”

 

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Chart of All The Supernatural Events Recorded in the Bible

Supernatural Events in the Bible Chronicled: Compiled by Dr. Norman L. Geisler

MATMM Geisler

Genesis

1 Creation of the world.
5:19–24 Translation of Enoch to be with God.
7:9–12, 17–24 The Noahic Flood.
11:1, 5–9 The Judgement on the Tower of Babel.
12:10–20 Plagues on Pharaoh for taking Abraham’s wife.
17:15–19; 18:10–14
21:1–8 Sarah’s conception of Isaac.
19:9–11 Angels blind the Sodomites.
19:15–29 The destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah.
19:24–26 Lot’s wife turned to salt.

Exodus

3:1–15 The Burning Bush.
4:1–5 Moses’ rod turned into a serpent and back.
4:6–7 Moses’ hand become leprous and is restored.
7:10–12 Aaron’s rod turns into a serpent and swallows up the rods of the Egyptian sorcerers.
7:19–24 Water in Egypt turned into blood.
8:5–7; 12–13 Frogs brought forth on the land of Egypt.
8:16–18 Lice are brought forth on the land of Egypt.
8:20–24 Swarms of flies are brought forth on Egypt but not on the land of Goshen.
9:1–7 Murrian (deadly pestilence) is brought on the cattle of the Egyptians, but not on Israel’s cattle.
9:8–11 Ashes produce boils on the Egyptians but not on Israel’s men and animals.
9:22–26 A terrible storm of thunder, hail, and fire which ran along the ground.
10:3–19 A plague of locusts on the Egyptians.
10:21–23 A plague of darkness was brought on the Egyptians while Israel had light.
12:29–30 Slaying the first born children.
13:21–22 The pillar of cloud led Israel by day, and the fire led them by night.
14:19–20 The angel of the Lord protects Israel from the Egyptians.
14:21–29 The parting of the Red Sea.
15:23–25 Sweetening of the bitter waters of Marah.
16:12–13 The camp of Israel is covered with quail.
16:14–15 Manna is provided for Israel to eat.
17:5–6 Moses strikes the rock and water is provided.
17:8–16 Remarkable victory over Amalek.
19:16–18 Fire and smoke engulf Mount Sinai.
19:19–25 God answers Moses from the Mount.
20:1–17 God gives the Ten Commandments to Moses.

Leviticus

9:23–24 Fire from the Lord consumes the burnt offering.
10:1–7 The fatal judgment upon Nadab and Abihu.

Numbers

11:1–2 Fire from God to consume murmuring Israelites.
12:10–15 Miriam is made leprous and is healed.
16:35 Fire from the Lord consumes 250 men who offered incense.
16:28–33 Korah and his rebels are swallowed by the earth.
16:46–48 The plague stopped by the offering of incense.
17:8 Aaron’s rod buds.
20:7–11 Moses strikes the rock to bring forth water.
21:6–9 Healing by looking at the brass serpent.
22:21–35 Balaam’s donkey speaks.

Joshua

3:14–17 The waters of the Jordan are divided.
5:13–15 The appearance of the Captain of the Lord’s hosts.
6 The fall of Jericho.
10:12–14 The sun stands still upon Gibeon.

Judges

2:1–5 The Angel of the Lord appears to Israel.
3:8–11 The Spirit of the Lord comes upon Othniel.
3:31 Shamgar slays 600 Philistines with an ox-goad.
6:11–24 The Angel of the Lord appears to Gideon.
6:36–40 The sign of Gideon’s fleece.
7:15–25 God delivers Midian into the hands of Gideon.
13:3–21 The Angel of the Lord appears to Manoah.
14:5–6 Samson slays the young lion.
15:14–17 Samson slays the Philistines with the jawbone of a donkey.
16:3 Samson tears down the city gate and carries it away.
16:27–31 Samson causes the collapse of the temple of Dagon.

1 Samuel

3:2–10 The voice of God calling Samuel.
5:1–5 The overturning of the god, Dagon.
5:6–12 Philistines in Ashdod smitten with tumors.
6:19 The Lord smites the men of Beth-Shemesh.
28:15–20 Samuel appears from the dead to rebuke Saul.

2 Samuel

6:6–7 The Lord fatally smites Uzzah.

1 Kings

3:3–28 God gives Solomon great wisdom.
17:1 Elijah prays and rain does not come for 3 years.
17:2–6 Elijah is fed by the ravens.
17:8–16 Meal and oil are supplied for the widow of Zarephath.
17:17–24 Elijah raises the widow’s son.
18:17–38 Fire from heaven consumes the sacrifice of Elijah on Mt. Carmel.
18:41–46 Elijah prays and God sends an abundance of rain in response.
19:5–8 Elijah is fed by the Angel of the Lord.

2 Kings

1:9–15 Fire from heaven consumes two captains and their men.
2:7–8 Elijah parts the waters of the Jordan and walks across on dry ground.
2:11 Elijah is taken up into heaven in a chariot of fire.
2:13–14 Elisha parts the waters of the Jordan.
2:19–22 Elisha heals the waters of Jericho.
2:24 Blasphemous youths killed by she bears.
3:15–20 Ditches are mysteriously filled with water.
4:1–7 A widow’s oil pot is refilled with oil by God.
4:8–17 Elisha prophesies and the Shunammite woman bears a son.
4:32–37 Elisha raises the Shunammite’s son.
4:38–41 Elisha detoxifies the poisonous pottage.
4:42–44 One hundred men are abundantly fed with 20 loaves of bread and 20 ears of corn.
5:1–14 Naaman is healed of leprosy.
5:27 Gehazi is struck with leprosy.
6:5–7 Iron axe head floats on water.
6:16–17 Elisha’s servant’s vision of the mountain full of horses and chariots of fire.
6:18 The Syrian army is struck with blindness.
6:19–20 God opens the eyes of the Syrians after Elisha leads them into Samaria.
13:20–21 A dead man is raised by contact with elisha’s bones.
20:9–11 Ahaz’s sundial returns backward by ten degrees.

Job

38–42:6 God speaks to Job from the whirlwind.

Isaiah

1:1 Isaiah’s vision concerning Jerusalem.
6 Isaiah’s vision of the Lord.

Exekiel

1 Exekiel has a vision of God’s glory.

Daniel

2:26–45 Daniel recounts and interprets Nebuchadnezzar’s dream.
3:14–30 Three Hebrew youths delivered from the fiery furnace.
5:5 The handwriting on the wall.
6:16–23 Daniel saved from the lions.
7:1–8:14 Daniel’s visions.
9:20–27 Daniel’s vision of the 70 weeks.
10:1–12:13 Further visions of Daniel.

Jonah

1:4–16 Tempestous storm from God to arrest the fleeing Jonah.
1:17 The Lord prepared a great fish to swallow Jonah.
4:6 The Lord prepares a gourd to shade Jonah.
4:7 The Lord prepared a worm to smite the gourd.
4:8 The Lord prepared a vehement east wind.

Matthew, Mark, Luke, & John

Matthew Mark Luke John Description
1:11–19 An angel of the lord appears to Zacharias.
1:20–22 Zacharias is struck dumb.
1:26–38 Angel of the Lord appears to Mary.
1:64 Zacharias healed of dumbness.
2:9–15 Angels appear to shepherds.
3:16–17 1:9–11 3:21–23 Holy Spirit decended as a Dove, and a voice from Heaven spoke.
4:11 1:13 Angels minister to Jesus after the temtation.
1:42–48 Jesus sees Nathanael under the fig tree.
2:1–11 Water turned into wine.
2:23 Jesus performs many signs.
4:46–53 Nobleman’s sone healed.
4:30 Jesus escapes from the hostile crowd.
5:6 Catching a draught of fish.
1:23–25; 4:33–35 Casting out an unclean spirit.
8:14–15 1:30–31 4:38–39 Healing Peter’s mother-in-law.
8:16 1:32–34 4:40 Healing many sick people.
4:23–24 1:39 Jesus heals all manner of sickness and casts out many demons.
8:2–3 1:40–42 5:12–13 Cleansing a leper.
9:2 2:3–5 5:18–20 Healing a paralytic.
5:6–9 Healing an infirmed man at Bethseda.
12:9–13 3:1–5 6:6–10 Healing the man’s withered hand.
12:15 3:10 Healing of many people.
8:5–13 7:1–10 Healing a centurion’s servant.
7:11–15 Raising a widow’s son at Nain.
12:22 Casting out a demon from a blind mute.
8:23–26 4:35–39 8:22–24 Stilling the storm on the sea of Galilee.
8:28–32 5:6–13 8:28–33 Casting out the demons and allowing them to enter swine.
9:23–25 5:35–42 8:49–55 Raising the ruler’s daughter.
9:20–22 5:25–34 8:43–48 Healing the woman with an issue of blood.
9:27–30 Healing two blind men.
6:5 Jesus heals a few sick people in Nazareth.
9:32–33 Casting out a demon from a deaf mute.
9:35 Jesus heals the sick in many cities.
14:14 Jesus heals the sick among the great multitude.
14:15–21 6:35–44 9:10–17 6:5–13 Feeding the five thousand.
14:25 6:48 6:19 Walking on the sea.
14:35–36 6:55–56 Healing of many at Gennesaret.
15:21–28 7:24–30 Healing the Canaanite woman’s daughter.
7:31–35 Healing a deaf mute.
15:30–31 Jesus heals many among a great multitude.
15:32–38 8:1–8 Feeding the four thousand.
8:22–25 Healing a blind man at Bethsaida.
17:1–8 9:2–8 9:28–36 Jesus’ transfiguration.
17:14–18 9:17–27 9:38–42 Healing the Epileptic boy.
17:24–27 Temple tax in the fish’s mouth.
9:1–7 Healing a man born blind.
11:14 Curing a demon-possessed, blind mute.
13:11–13 Healing an infirmed woman.
14:2–4 Healing a man with dropsy.
11:43–44 Raising Lazarus.
17:12–14 Cleansing ten lepers.
19:1–2 Jesus heals many at the borders of Judea.
20:30–34 Healing the two blind men.
21:14 18:35 Jesus heals the blind and the lame man in the temple.
21:18–19 11:12–14; 20 Withering the fig tree.
12:28–29 A voice from Heaven.
22:51 Restoring a servant’s ear.
27:51 15:38 23:45 The Veil of the Temple is torn from top to bottom.
27:51 A great earthquake, and the rocks were broken.
27:52–53 The tombs were opened and many of the dead are raised.
28:1–10 16:1–8 24:1–12 20:1–9 The resurrection of Jesus.
28:1–7 An angel rolls the stone from the grave and speaks to the women.
28:5–8 16:5–7 24:4–8 Angelic appearance to those at the sepulcher.
20:11–13 Two angels appear to Mary.
16:9 20:14–17 Jesus appears to Mary Magdalene.
28:9–10 Jesus appears to the women.
16:12 24:13–35 Jesus appears to the two on the road to Emmaus.
20:19–23 Jesus appears to 10 apostles.
28:16–20 16:14–18 24:36–49 20:26–31 Jesus appears to 11 apostles.
21:1–25 Jesus appears to 7 apostles.
21:6 Miraculous catch of fish.

Acts

1:3–5 Jesus appears to all the apostles. (Lk 24:24–51)
1:6–9 Jesus ascends into heaven.
1:10–11 Two angels appear to the apostles.
2:1–4 The coming of the Holy Spirit on the apostles.
2:4–13 The apostles speak with other tongues.
3:1–11 Peter heals the lame man in the temple.
5:5–10 Ananias and Sapphira are killed.
5:12 Many signs and wonders performed by the apostles.
5:18–20 Anel releases the apostles form prison.
7:55–56 Stehen sees Jesus at the right hand of God.
8:7 Unclean spirits are cast out of many.
8:13 Philip performs miracles and signs.
8:14–17 The Samarians receive the Holy Spirit.
8:39–40 Philip caught away by the Holy Spirit.
9:3–7 Jesus appears to Saul (cf. 1 Cor. 15:8).
9:10–16 Jesus appears to Ananias.
9:17–19 Saul’s sight is restored.
9:32–34 Peter heals Aneneas.
9:36–42 Dorcas is restored to life.
10:1–8 Cornelius receives a vision.
10:9–16 Peter receives a vision three times.
10:44–48 Cornelius’ household receives the Holy Spirit.
12:7–10 An angel releases Peter from prison.
12:23 The angel of the Lord kills Herod.
13:8–11 Elymas the sorcerer is blinded.
14:8–10 Paul heals a lame man at Lystra.
16:16–18 Paul casts a demon out of a young woman.
18:9–10 The Lord appears to Paul.
19:6 Believers at Ephesus receive the Holy Spirit.
19:11–12 Many unusual signs performed by Paul.
20:9–12 Eutychus is restored to life.
23:11 The Lord appears to Paul.
28:3–6 Paul protected from the viper bite.
28:7–8 Paul heals the father of Publius.
16:25–26 Prison doors opened and Paul’s and Silas’ bands are broken off.

1 Corinthians

15:6 Jesus’ appearance to five hundred people.
15:7 Jesus’ appearance to James.

2 Corinthians

12:1–6 Paul’s vision of heaven.

Revelation

1:1–3:22 John’s vision of Jesus.
4:1–22:21 John’s vision of the future.
6:12 A great earthquake.
6:12 The sun becomes black as sackcloth.
6:12 The moon becomes as blood.
6:13 The stars fall from heaven to earth.
6:14 Every mountain is moved out of its place.
8:7 Hail and fire mingled with blood falls on the earth.
8:8 Something like a great burning mountain is cast into the sea, and a third part of the sea becomes blood.
8:9 A third part of the creatures in the sea die.
8:9 A third part of the ships are destroyed.
8:10–11 A great, burning star falls from heaven and a third part of the rivers and fountains become bitter.
8:12 A third part of the sun is darkened.
8:12 A third part of the moon is darkened.
8:12 A third part of the stars are darkened.
9:1 A star falls from heaven.
9:2 The sun is darkened by the smoke from the botomless pit.
9:3–11 A plague of locusts are given power to torment men for 5 months.
9:18 A third part of mankind is killed.
11:5 The two witnesses devour their enemies by fire from their mouths.
11:6 The two witnesses stop the rain for 3 1/2 years.
11:6 The two witnesses turn water into blood.
11:6 The two witnesses smite the earth with many plagues.
11:11 The two witnesses are raised from the dead.
11:12 The two witnesses ascend into heaven.
11:13 There is a great earthquake in which a tenth part of the city falls, and 7000 men are slain.
11:19 There are lightenings, voices, thunderings and earthquake and great hail.
16:2 Fowl and loathsome sores fall on men who worship the beast.
16:3 The sea becomes as blood, and every living soul in it dies.
16:4 The rivers and fountains of waters become blood.
16:8 The sun scorches men with fire.
16:10 Darkness covers the kingdom of the beast.
16:12 The water of the river Euphrates is dried up.
16:18 There are voices and thunders and a great earthquake.
16:20 The islands flee and the mountains cannot be found.
16:21 A great hail of heavy stones falls on people.
18:1–24 The fall of Babylon.
19:11–16 The return of Jesus Christ.
21:1 The new heaven and the new earth appear.
21:10 The new Jerusalem descending from heaven.

Not all these events are miracles in the technical sense of a direct action of God superseding a natural law. Some (e.g. Gen. 7, 19) may be a special act of divine providence where God uses natural laws to accomplish His purpose.

Chart adapted from Appendix 2 in Norman L. Geisler. Miracles and the Modern Mind: A Defense of Biblical Miracles. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker (1992).

 
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Posted by on June 18, 2013 in Book Excerpts, Charts

 

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The Jesus Focus in 2 Corinthians

Reading The Bible Through The Jesus Lens in the Book of 2 Corinthians

From Biblical Book to Biblical Hook

Chart adapted from *Dr. Michael Williams Book

How To Read The Bible Through the Jesus Lens IMage

Title for 2 Corinthians

2 Corinthians: Theme

2 Corinthians 2:17

“Self-Giving”

God directs Paul to explain and vindicate his apostolic authority while encouraging the generosity of the Corinthian church.

“Unlike so many, we do not peddle the word of God for profit. On the contrary, in Christ we speak before God with sincerity, as those sent from God.”

Christ-Focus in 2 Corinthians

Implications from 2 Corinthians

Hooks from 2 Corinthians

Jesus gave himself completely for the welfare of his people.

 

For you know the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, that though he was rich, yet for your sake he became poor, so that you by his poverty might become rich. – 2 Corinthians 8:9

God will provide for our needs as we give ourselves to others.

The point is this: whoever sows sparingly will also reap sparingly, and whoever sows bountifully will also reap bountifully. Each one must give as he has decided in his heart, not reluctantly or under compulsion, for God loves a cheerful giver. And God is able to make all grace abound to you, so that having all sufficiency in all things at all times, you may abound in every good work. As it is written,

“He has distributed freely, he has given to the poor; his righteousness endures forever.”

He who supplies seed to the sower and bread for food will supply and multiply your seed for sowing and increase the harvest of your righteousness. You will be enriched in every way to be generous in every way, which through us will produce thanksgiving to God. – 2 Corinthians 9:6-11

Is it really better to give than receive?

Which would you rather do?

What if giving involves giving up comfort, safety, or even your life?

Why would anyone give like that?

Is it possible for you to give more than you already have received?

What have you already received from God?

 Michael James Williams image

*Michael James Williams in his own words: “After my conversion in the U. S. Navy (in a submarine beneath the North Atlantic!), I entered Columbia Bible College, where I received a B.A. (1985). This was followed by an M.A. in Religion at Westminster Theological Seminary (1987) and a Ph.D. in Biblical Studies at the University of Pennsylvania (1999). In 2000, I was ordained in the Christian Reformed Church, and since 1995 have been teaching at Calvin Theological Seminary. I have also taught courses at Westminster Theological Seminary, the University of Pennsylvania, and brief stints in Limuru, Kenya; Donetsk, Ukraine; and Warsaw, Poland. In addition to articles on Old Testament topics in various reference works and academic journals, and contributing to and editing “Mishneh Todah: Studies in Deuteronomy and Its Cultural Environment in Honor of Jeffrey H. Tigay” (2009); I have authored “Deception in Genesis: A Comprehensive Analysis of a Unique Biblical Phenomenon” (2001); “The Prophet and His Message: Reading Old Testament Prophecy Today” (2003); and, most recently, “How to Read the Bible through the Jesus Lens: A Guide to Christ-Focused Reading of Scripture” (2012). My amazing wife, Dawn, and I enjoy hiking and all things outdoors.”

 

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