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About lifecoach4God

I am the Lead Pastor of Valley Baptist Church (Bay Area), born and raised in Huntington Beach, Ca,, and currently living in Novato, California. I am married to my best friend of 23 years - Dana - and have one teenager still living at home; four adult children; and four grand children. I have been a Teaching Pastor for over twenty years. I was privileged to study at Multnomah University (B.S. - 1988); Talbot School of Theology (M.Div. - 1991); Westminster Theological Seminary & Northwest Graduate School (D. Min. - 2003). I founded Vertical Living Ministries in 2008 with the goal of encouraging Christian Disciples and Leaders to be more intentionally Christ-Centered in how they live by bringing glory to God in nine key areas of life: personal spiritually, in marriage, in their families, with friends, vocationally, physical health, finances, discipleship, and mentoring .

COVENANT, DISPENSATIONAL, & REVELATORY THEOLOGICAL SYSTEMS COMPARED

A CHART COMPARING DISPENSATIONAL & COVENANTAL SYSTEMS

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Pattern of History:

Covenant Theology: Covenant of Works with Adam; Covenant of Grace with Christ on behalf of the elect (some distinguish between the covenant of Redemption with Christ and the covenant of grace with the elect).

Classical Dispensationalism: Divided into dispensations (usually seven); e.g., (1) Innocence (pre-fall), (2) Conscience (Adam), (3) Human Government (Noah), (4) Promise (Abraham), (5) Law (Moses), (6) Grace (Christ’s First Coming), (7) Kingdom (Christ’s Second Coming).

Progressive Dispensationalism: Divided into dispensations, of which four are prominent: (1) Patriarchal (Promise); (2) Mosaic (Law); (3) Ecclesial (Church); (4) Zionic (Millennium, the New Heavens and New Earth).

Revelatory View: Revelation and election initiatives succeeded by human failure to respond appropriately. Periods of transition then lead to further initiatives.

God’s Purpose in History:

Covenant Theology: There is a unified redemptive purpose.

Classical Dispensationalism: There are two distinct purposes, one earthly (Israel), one heavenly (church).

Progressive Dispensationalism: To manifest His glory in a progressive redemption that covers every sphere of creation and every structure of human relationship.

Revelatory View: The objective of self-revelation is pursued culminating in the revelation of a plan of salvation, whereby the goal of relationship may be achieved. It is a unified purpose, but not soteric throughout.

View of Biblical Covenants:

Covenant Theology: They are different administrations of the Covenant of Grace. Temporal promises are conditional and applicable to the church.

Classical Dispensationalism: They mark of periods of time during which God’s specific demands of people differ. Temporal promises are unconditional and are applicable to ethnic Israel.

Progressive Dispensationalism: The biblical covenants of promise (Abrahamic, Davidic, and New) are made originally to His people, Israel. Believing gentiles are included through Christ, who is the means of blessing for all who believe. All covenants have an “already-not-yet” structure.

Revelatory View: There are revelatory initiatives facilitated through various types of election. Temporal promises are conditional but remain applicable to ethnic Israel. The covenant is characteristically redemptive; ultimately soteric; but essentially revelatory.

Relationship of the OT Law to the NT:

Covenant Theology: Acceptance of OT teaching required unless specifically abrogated  by the NT.

Classical Dispensationalism: OT prescriptions are not binding unless they are reaffirmed in the NT.

Progressive Dispensationalism: Individual aspects of the Law are assessed canonically on a case-by-case basis. Christ completes and fulfills the law.

Revelatory View: OT legal passages function within the covenant serving a revelatory purpose that continues to be relevant. The law of Christ has been superimposed on the law of Moses.

Relationship Between Israel and the Church:

Covenant Theology: The church is spiritual Israel, in continuity with true Israel of the OT.

Classical Dispensationalism: The church is the spiritual people of God, distinct from Israel, the physical people of God.

Progressive Dispensationalism: Church = the unified community that receives God’s spiritual blessings in Christ. Israel = the national and political community in the midst of nations that ultimately will be blessed fully by God. Ultimately united in redemption.

Revelatory View: The Church is the people of God defined soteriologically. Israel, previously the revelatory people of God, now may cross over and become a subset of the soteriological people of God (now that their revelatory function is complete) if they respond by faith to the plan of salvation.

Old Testament Prophecy:

Covenant Theology: Refers to God’s people, the church.

Classical Dispensationalism: Refers to ethnic Israel.

Progressive Dispensationalism: Fulness of blessing to be given to believing Israel (and those in the nations who believe) in the final dispensation.

Revelatory View: Refers to ethnic Israel but conditional upon their faithful response.

Church Age:

Covenant Theology: God’s redemptive purpose continued to unfold.

Classical Dispensationalism: There is a parenthesis between past and future manifestations of the kingdom.

Progressive Dispensationalism: From Pentecost to the rapture, a phase in the progressive outworking of God’s wholistic redemption. It is not a parenthesis in the kingdom program.

Revelatory View: The period begun when the people of God are defined soteriologically as a result of God’s plan of salvation being reveled.

*Chart adapted from John H. Walton. Covenant: God’s Purpose, God’s Plan. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1994. John H. Walton has proposed the “Revelatory View.”

 

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Is Mankind Two or Three?

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The Dichotomist Position: Man as a Twofold Being = Body and Soul/Spirit

(1a. For) God breathed into man but one principle–a living soul (Genesis 2:7, “then the Lord God formed the man of dust from the ground and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life, and the man became a living creature.”).

(1b. Against) The Hebrew text is plural, “Then the Lord God formed man of dust from the ground and breathed into his nostrils the breath of (lives); and man became a living being.”

(2a. For) The immaterial part of man (the soul) is viewed as an individual and conscious life, capable of possessing and animating a physical organism (body).

(2b. Against) Paul states that man has both a spirit and a soul, which are housed in a physical body (1 Thessalonians 5:23, “Now may the God of peace himself sanctify you completely, and may your whole spirit and soul and body be kept blameless at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ.”).

“Now may the God of peace himself sanctify you completely, and may your whole spirit and soul and body be kept blameless at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ.”(3a. For) The terms “soul” and “spirit” seem to be used interchangeably in some references (Genesis 41:8, “So in the morning his spirit was troubled, and he sent and called for all the magicians of Egypt and all its wise men. Pharaoh told them his dreams, but there was none who could interpret them to Pharaoh.” & Psalm 42:6, “and my God. My soul is cast down within me; therefore I remember you from the land of Jordan and of Hermon, from Mount Mizar.” & Matthew 27:50, “And Jesus cried out again with a loud voice and yielded up his spirit” & John 12:27, “Now is my soul troubled. And what shall I say? ‘Father, save me from this hour’? But for this purpose I have come to this hour.” & John 13:21, “After saying these things, Jesus was troubled in his spirit, and testified, “Truly, truly, I say to you, one of you will betray me.” & Hebrews 12:23, “and to the assembly of the firstborn who are enrolled in heaven, and to God, the judge of all, and to the spirits of the righteous made perfect” & Revelation 6:9, “When he opened the fifth seal, I saw under the altar the souls of those who had been slain for the word of God and for the witness they had borne.”

(3b. Against) Hebrews 4:12, “For the word of God is living and active, sharper than any two-edged sword, piercing to the division of soul and of spirit, of joints and of marrow, and discerning the thoughts and intentions of the heart.” If the soul and the spirit were the same, they could not be divided.

(4a. For) “Spirit” (as well as “soul”) is ascribed to brute creation: Ecclesiastes 3:21, “Who knows whether the spirit of man goes upward and the spirit of the beast goes down into the earth?” & Revelation 16:3, “The second angel poured out his bowl into the sea, and it became like the blood of a corpse, and every living thing died that was in the sea.”

(4b. Against) The term “spirit” or “soul” may be used for animal “life” or “animation” but never in the unique sense in which a human spirit or soul is used. Human spirits continue beyond physical existence, unlike the animals, and human spirits are in relationship with the divine spirit of God (Matthew 17:3, “And behold, there appeared to them Moses and Elijah, talking with him.” & Acts 7:59, “And as they were stoning Stephen, he called out, “Lord Jesus, receive my spirit.” & Galatians 6:8, “For the one who sows to his own flesh will from the flesh reap corruption, but the one who sows to the Spirit will from the Spirit reap eternal life.” & 1 Thessalonians 5:23, “Now may the God of peace himself sanctify you completely, and may your whole spirit and soul and body be kept blameless at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ.” ).

(5a. For) Body and soul are spoken of as constituting the whole person (Matthew 10:28, “And do not fear those who kill the body but cannot kill the soul. Rather fear him who can destroy both soul and body in hell.” & 1 Corinthians 5:3, “For though absent in body, I am present in spirit; and as if present, I have already pronounced judgment on the one who did such a thing.” & 3 John 2, “Beloved, I pray that all may go well with you and that you may be in good health, as it goes well with your soul.”).

(5b. Against) The spirit, soul, and body are spoken of as constituting the whole person (Mark 12:30, “And you shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind and with all your strength.” & 1 Corinthians 2:14, “The natural person does not accept the things of the Spirit of God, for they are folly to him, and he is not able to understand them because they are spiritually discerned.” & 1 Corinthians 3:4, “For when one says, “I follow Paul,” and another, “I follow Apollos,” are you not being merely human?”).

(6a. For) Consciousness testifies that there are two elements in man’s being. We can distinguish a material part and an immaterial part, but the consciousness of no one can distinguish between the soul and the spirit.

(6b. Against) It is the spirit of man that deals with the spiritual realm. The soul is the dimension of man that deals with the mental realm, man’s intellect, the sensibilities, and the will–the part that reasons and thinks. The body is the part of man that contacts or deals with the physical realm. hebrews 4:12 does literally speak of the separation of the soul from the spirit (see also 1 Thess. 5:23 above; John 3:7-8, “Do not marvel that I said to you, ‘You must be born again.’ The wind blows where it wishes, and you hear its sound, but you do not know where it comes from or where it goes. So it is with everyone who is born of the Spirit.” & Romans 2:28-29, “For no one is a Jew who is merely one outwardly, nor is circumcision outward and physical.  But a Jew is one inwardly, and circumcision is a matter of the heart, by the Spirit, not by the letter. His praise is not from man but from God.” & 1 Corinthians 2:14 and 14:14, “The natural person does not accept the things of the Spirit of God, for they are folly to him, and he is not able to understand them because they are spiritually discerned…For if I pray in a tongue, my spirit prays but my mind is unfruitful.”).

The Trichotomist Position: Man as a Threefold Being: Body, Soul, and Spirit

(1a. For) Genesis 2:7 does not absolutely declare that God made a twofold being. The Hebrew text is plural, “The Lord God formed man from the dust of the ground and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life [lives], and man became a living being.”

(1b. Against) It is not said that man became spirit and soul. And further, “living being” is the same phrase used of animals and translated “living creature” (Genesis 1:21-24, “So God created the great sea creatures and every living creature that moves, with which the waters swarm, according to their kinds, and every winged bird according to its kind. And God saw that it was good. And God blessed them, saying, “Be fruitful and multiply and fill the waters in the seas, and let birds multiply on the earth.” And there was evening and there was morning, the fifth day. And God said, “Let the earth bring forth living creatures according to their kinds—livestock and creeping things and beasts of the earth according to their kinds.” And it was so.”).

(2a. For) Paul seems to think of the body, soul, and spirit as three distinct parts of man’s nature (1 Thess 5:23 – see above). The same seems to be indicated in Hebrews 4:12, where the Word is said to pierce “even to dividing soul and spirit, joints and marrow.”

(2b. Against) Paul is emphasizing the whole person, not attempting to differentiate his parts. Hebrews 4:12 does not speak of the separation of the soul from the spirit, but of the separation itself extending to that point. The Word pierces to the dividing of the soul itself. The soul and spirit are laid open.

(3a. For) A threefold organization of man’s nature may be implied in the classification of man as natural,” “carnal,” and “spiritual,” in 1 Corinthians 2:14 and 3:1-4, “The natural person does not accept the things of the Spirit of God, for they are folly to him, and he is not able to understand them because they are spiritually discerned…But I, brothers, could not address you as spiritual people, but as people of the flesh, as infants in Christ. I fed you with milk, not solid food, for you were not ready for it. And even now you are not yet ready, for you are still of the flesh. For while there is jealousy and strife among you, are you not of the flesh and behaving only in a human way? For when one says, “I follow Paul,” and another, “I follow Apollos,” are you not being merely human?”

(3b. Against) Body and soul are spoke of as constituting the whole person: 1 Corinthians 5:3, “For though absent in body, I am present in spirit; and as if present, I have already pronounced judgment on the one who did such a thing.”& 3 John 2, “Beloved, I pray that all may go well with you and that you may be in good health, as it goes well with your soul.” & Matthew 10:28, “And do not fear those who kill the body but cannot kill the soul. Rather fear him who can destroy both soul and body in hell.”

(4a. For) In Luke 8:55, we read about the girl whom Jesus raised from the dead that “her spirit [pnuema] returned.” And so when Christ died, it is said that “he gave up his life,” “he dismissed his spirit,” (Matt. 27:50). “The body without the spirit is dead” (James 2:27). Pneuma refers to a life principle apart from the soul.

(4b. Against) Pneuma (spirit)and psyche (soul) are used interchangeably throughout the New Testament. Both represent one life principle.

Above adapted from H. Wayne House. Charts of Christian Theology and Doctrine. Grand Rapids, Zondervan, 1992.

 
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Posted by on January 14, 2016 in Book Excerpts

 

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Will Everyone Go To Heaven?

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Varieties of Universalism

(1) Universal Reconciliation (The View of some Barthians – followers of Karl Barth): Maintains that Christ’s death accomplished its purpose of reconciling all mankind to God. Whatever separation exists between man and the benefits of God’s grace is subjective in nature, existing only in man’s mind. Reconciliation is an accomplished fact.

(2) Universal Pardon (The View of C.H. Dodd): Maintains that God, being loving, will not hold unswervingly to the conditions he has laid down. Though threatening eternal punishment he will in the end relent and forgive everyone. God will treat all persons as if they had believed.

(3) Universal Restoration (The View of Origen): At some point in the future all things will be restored to their original and intended state. Full salvation may be preceded by cycles of reincarnation or by some purgatorial period at the beginning of the life hereafter.

(4) The Doctrine of a Second Chance: The work of Christ is sufficient to secure the salvation of the elect, but salvation is effectually secured by the means of faith (Romans 10:10-13, “For with the heart one believes and is justified, and with the mouth one confesses and is saved. For the Scripture says, “Everyone who believes in him will not be put to shame.” For there is no distinction between Jew and Greek; for the same Lord is Lord of all, bestowing his riches on all who call on him. For “everyone who calls on the name of the Lord will be saved.”). All people, even those who have heard and rejected, will be confronted with the claims of Christ in the life to come. Everyone given such an opportunity will of course accept it.

(5) Universal Temporal Blessings: The natural benefits of the world are also enjoyed by everyone. These benefits include sunshine, rain, good health, etc., and are a result of God’s common grace. These things are given from God because of his character.

Arguments For and Against Universalism

(1a. For) It is ridiculous to think that a living, all-powerful, and sovereign God could create a system whereby a portion of mankind (the epitome of his creation) would be condemned to everlasting punishment.

(1b. Against) God will not do anything that contradicts any of his attributes. hence in order to harmonize his perfect love and perfect justice, he devised the biblically explained system of redemption. We must accept the biblical record, not our own finite reasoning.

(2a. For) To condemn the unsaved to everlasting punishment as a result of a relatively short life span on earth is unjust.

(2b. Against) God is the final standard of justice, not man.

(3a. For) If an all-powerful sovereign God desires all people to be saved (1 Timothy 2:3-4, “This is good, and it is pleasing in the sight of God our Savior, who desires all people to be saved and to come to the knowledge of the truth.” and 2 Peter 3:9, “The Lord is not slow to fulfill his promise as some count slowness, but is patient toward you, not wishing that any should perish, but that all should reach repentance.”), then surely all are saved.

(3b. Against) The Timothy and Peter passages in their context refer to all kinds of people and to “all” the elect in their contexts. Although God desires salvation for all mankind (specifically the elect) a person must respond to God’s offer of salvation and many do not (John 5:40, “yet you refuse to come to me that you may have life.” & Matthew 7:14, “For the gate is narrow and the way is hard that leads to life, and those who find it are few.”

(4a. For) Christ’s death has acquitted all mankind of their condemnation before God, just as Adam brought the entire human race into sin (Romans 5:18, “Therefore, as one trespass led to condemnation for all men, so one act of righteousness leads to justification and life for all men.” & 1 Corinthians 15:22, “For as in Adam all die, so also in Christ shall all be made alive.”

(4b. Against) The context of both of these passages clearly shows that the benefits of Christ’s death are for those “in Christ,” just as the penalties of Adam’s sin are for those “in Adam.”

(5a. For) The theme of the New Testament is the of God’s sovereign love. If his love is sovereign, it must be completely victorious. To say that God’s love is not adequate to secure the salvation of all mankind in the end presumes a finite God.

(5b. Against) Agreed, God has infinite love, but he also has justice and holiness. He has already devised a plan consistent with all his infinite attributes. It is up to man to accept God’s plan, instead of devising his own plan and calling God unjust if he does not accept it.

(6a. For) Christ paid the penalty of sin on behalf of all mankind (Hebrews 2:9, “But we see him who for a little while was made lower than the angels, namely Jesus, crowned with glory and honor because of the suffering of death, so that by the grace of God he might taste death for everyone.”), and legally, if such as adequate substitution is made and accepted, it is unjust for the creditor to require the original payment also.

(6b. Against) The substitutionary death of Christ was sufficient for the salvation of all (efficient only for the elect); however, each person must believe in order for it to be effectual on his behalf (2 Corinthians 5:19-20, “that is, in Christ God was reconciling the world to himself, not counting their trespasses against them, and entrusting to us the message of reconciliation. 20 Therefore, we are ambassadors for Christ, God making his appeal through us. We implore you on behalf of Christ, be reconciled to God.”).

(7a. For) God’s all-encompassing attribute is love. His judgment is only a temporary measure to reform unrepentant persons, and hence is itself motivated by love. Ultimately all people will be reformed, whether in this life or in the after-life, and hence ultimately all will be saved.

(7b. Against) Scripture never refers to the abode of unbelievers after death as a place of reformation. It is always referred to as a place of destruction and punishment (Matthew 25:46, “And these will go away into eternal punishment, but the righteous into eternal life.” & John 3:36, “Whoever believes in the Son has eternal life; whoever does not obey the Son shall not see life, but the wrath of God remains on him.”). The only reference to any encounter of Christ with unbelievers after their death is 1 Peter 3:19, and this passage is applicable only to unbelievers in Noah’s day.

(8a. For) Ultimately all mankind will believe, whether in this life or the hereafter (Philippians 2:10-11, “so that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, in heaven and on earth and under the earth, and every tongue confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.” & 1 Peter 3:19-20, “in which he went and proclaimed to the spirits in prison, 20 because they formerly did not obey, when God’s patience waited in the days of Noah, while the ark was being prepared, in which a few, that is, eight persons, were brought safely through water.”).

(8b. Against) Contextually both of these passages do not prove the point from the context. The words of Jesus indicate clearly that some go to eternal life and others go to eternal punishment. Matthew 7:21-23,“Not everyone who says to me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ will enter the kingdom of heaven, but the one who does the will of my Father who is in heaven. On that day many will say to me, ‘Lord, Lord, did we not prophesy in your name, and cast out demons in your name, and do many mighty works in your name?’ And then will I declare to them, ‘I never knew you; depart from me, you workers of lawlessness.’ &  John 3:18, “Whoever believes in him is not condemned, but whoever does not believe is condemned already, because he has not believed in the name of the only Son of God.” & Matthew 25:46, “And these will go away into eternal punishment, but the righteous into eternal life.” In this passage from Matthew the word for eternal is aionos, meaning “relating to the final order of things which will not pass away.”

(9a. For) Many will not believe in this life, but the after-life offers a second chance.

(9b. Against) The constant scriptural references to “saving faith” clearly indicate that some will NOT believe (John 1:11-12, “[Jesus] He came to his own, and his own people did not receive him. But to all who did receive him, who believed in his name, he gave the right to become children of God,”;  & John 20:31, “but these are written so that you may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God, and that by believing you may have life in his name.”

(10a. For) Warnings of lostness are merely hypothetical and constitute one of the ways in which God secures the universal salvation of all mankind.

(10b. Against) Christ and the apostles were constantly warning people of God’s wrath and judgment on sin and urgently calling them to repentance. Hence, if universalism is true, Christ and the apostles were either ignorant or grossly deceptive. Other Scriptures points to the punishment of the non-elect (Romans 9:22, “What if God, desiring to show his wrath and to make known his power, has endured with much patience vessels of wrath prepared for destruction.” & 2 Thessalonians 1:9, “They will suffer the punishment of eternal destruction, away from the presence of the Lord and from the glory of his might.” & Revelation 21:8, “But as for the cowardly, the faithless, the detestable, as for murderers, the sexually immoral, sorcerers, idolaters, and all liars, their portion will be in the lake that burns with fire and sulfur, which is the second death.”

Some of the material above adapted from H. Wayne House, Charts of Christian Theology and Doctrine. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 1992.

 

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354 Prophecies Fulfilled in Jesus Christ

“Behold, I have come: in the volume of the scroll it is written of me” (Psalm 40:7).

“The testimony of Jesus is the spirit of prophecy” (Revelation 19:10).

“…all things must be fulfilled, which were written in the law of Moses, and in the prophets, and in the psalms, concerning me” (Jesus Christ, Luke 24:44).

“For if you believed Moses, you would have believed me: for he wrote of me.” (Jesus Christ, John 5:46).

“To Him give all the prophets witness” (Acts 10:43).

Scripture/ Prophecy/ Fulfillment

1. Gen. 3:15 – Seed of a woman (virgin birth)-  Gal. 4:4-5, Matt. 1:18

2. Gen. 3:15 – He will bruise Satan’s head – Heb. 2:14, 1 Jn 3:8

3. Gen. 3:15 – Christ’s heel would be bruised with nails on the cross – Matt. 27:35, Lk 24:39-40

4. Gen. 5:24 – The bodily ascension to heaven illustrated – Mark 16:19

5. Gen. 9:26, 27 – The God of Shem will be the Son of Shem – Luke 3:36

6. Gen. 12:3 – Seed of Abraham will bless all nations – Gal. 3:8, Acts 3:25, 26

7. Gen. 12:7 – The Promise made to Abraham’s Seed – Galatians 3:16

8. Gen. 14:18 – A priest after the order of Melchizedek – Hebrews 6:20

9. Gen. 14:18 – King of Peace and Righteousness – Hebrews 7:2

10. Gen. 14:18 – The Last Supper foreshadowed – Matthew 26:26-29

11. Gen. 17:19 – Seed of Isaac (Gen. 21:12) – Romans 9:7

12. Gen. 22:8 – The Lamb of God promised – John 1:29

13. Gen. 22:18 – As Isaac’s seed, will bless all nations – Galatians 3:16

14. Gen. 26:2-5 – The Seed of Isaac promised as the Redeemer – Hebrews 11:18

15. Gen. 28:12 –  The Bridge to heaven – John 1:51

16. Gen. 28:14 – The Seed of Jacob – Luke 3:34

17. Gen. 49:10 – The time of His coming – Luke 2:1-7; Galatians 4:4

18. Gen. 49:10 – The Seed of Judah – Luke 3:33

19. Gen. 49:10 – Called Shiloh or One Sent – John 17:3

20. Gen. 49:10 – Messiah to come before Judah lost identity – John 11:47-52

21. Gen. 49:10 – Unto Him shall the obedience of the people be – John 10:16

22. Ex. 3:13-15 – The Great “I AM” – John 4:26, 8:58

23. Ex. 12:3-6 – The Lamb presented to Israel 4 days before Passover – Mark 11:7-11

24. Ex. 12:5 – A Lamb without blemish – Hebrews 9:14; 1 Peter 1:19

25. Ex. 12:13 – The blood of the Lamb saves from wrath – Romans 5:8

26. Ex. 12:21-27 – Christ is our Passover – 1 Corinthians 5:7

27. Ex. 12:46 – Not a bone of the Lamb to be broken – John 19:31-36

28. Ex. 15:2 – His exaltation predicted as Yeshua – Acts 7:55, 56

29. Ex. 15:11 – His Character-Holiness – Luke 1:35; Acts 4:27

30. Ex. 17:6 – The Spiritual Rock of Israel – 1 Corinthians 10:4

31. Ex. 33:19 – His Character-Merciful – Luke 1:72

32. Lev. 1:2-9 – His sacrifice a sweet smelling savor unto God – Eph. 5:2

33. Lev. 14:11 – The leper cleansed-Sign to priesthood – Luke 5:12-14; Acts 6:7

34. Lev. 16:15-17 – Prefigures Christ’s once-for-all death – Hebrews 9:7-14

35. Lev. 16:27 – Suffering outside the Camp – Matthew 27:33; Heb. 13:11, 12

36. Lev. 17:11 – The Blood-the life of the flesh – Matthew 26:28; Mark 10:45

37. Lev. 17:11 – It is the blood that makes atonement – Rom. 3:23-24; 1John 1:7

38. Lev. 23:36-37 – The Drink-offering: “If any man thirst”-  John 7:37

39. Num. 9:12 – Not a bone of Him broken – John 19:31-36

40. Num. 21:9 – The serpent on a pole-Christ lifted up – John 3:14-18, 12:32

41. Num. 24:17 –  Time: “I shall see him, but not now.”-  John 1:14; Galatians 4:4

42. Deut. 18:15 – “This is of a truth that prophet.” – John 6:14

43. Deut. 18:15-16 – “Had ye believed Moses, ye would believe me.” – John 5:45-47

44. Deut. 18:18 – Sent by the Father to speak His word – John 8:28, 29

45. Deut. 18:19 – Whoever will not hear must bear his sin – Acts 3:22-23

46. Deut. 21:23 – Cursed is he that hangs on a tree – Galatians 3:10-13

47. Joshua 5:14-15 – The Captain of our salvation – Hebrews 2:10

48. Ruth 4:4-10 – Christ, our kinsman, has redeemed us – Ephesians 1:3-7

49. 1 Sam. 2:35 – A Faithful Priest – Heb. 2:17, 3:1-3, 6, 7:24-25

50. 1 Sam. 2:10 – Shall be an anointed King to the Lord – Mt. 28:18, John 12:15

51. 2 Sam. 7:12 – David’s Seed – Matthew 1:1

52. 2 Sam. 7:13 – His Kingdom is everlasting – 2 Peter 1:11

53. 2 Sam. 7:14a – The Son of God – Luke 1:32, Romans 1:3-4

54. 2 Sam. 7:16 –  David’s house established forever – Luke 3:31; Rev. 22:16

55. 2 Ki. 2:11 – The bodily ascension to heaven illustrated – Luke 24:51

56. 1 Chr. 17:11 – David’s Seed – Matthew 1:1, 9:27

57. 1 Chr. 17:12-13 – To reign on David’s throne forever – Luke 1:32, 33

58. 1 Chr. 17:13 – “I will be His Father, He…my Son.” – Hebrews 1:5

59. Job 9:32-33 – Mediator between man and God – 1 Timothy 2:5

60. Job 19:23-27 – The Resurrection predicted – John 5:24-29

61. Psa. 2:1-3 – The enmity of kings foreordained – Acts 4:25-28

62. Psa. 2:2 – To own the title, Anointed (Christ) – Jn. 1:41, Acts 2:36

63. Psa. 2:6 – His Character-Holiness – John 8:46; Revelation 3:7

64. Psa. 2:6 – To own the title King – Matthew 2:2

65. Psa. 2:7 – Declared the Beloved Son – Matthew 3:17, Romans 1:4

66. Psa. 2:7, 8 The Crucifixion and Resurrection intimated Acts 13:29-33

67. Psa. 2:8, 9 – Rule the nations with a rod of iron – Rev. 2:27, 12:5, 19:15

68. Psa. 2:12 – Life comes through faith in Him – John 20:31

69. Psa. 8:2 – The mouths of babes perfect His praise – Matthew 21:16

70. Psa. 8:5, 6 – His humiliation and exaltation – Hebrews 2:5-9

71. Psa. 9:7-10 – Judge the world in righteousness – Acts 17:31

72. Psa. 16:10 – Was not to see corruption – Acts 2:31, 13:35

73. Psa. 16:9-11 – Was to arise from the dead – John 20:9

74. Psa. 17:15 – The resurrection predicted – Luke 24:6

75. Psa. 18:2-3 – The horn of salvation – Luke 1:69-71

76. Psa. 22:1 – Forsaken because of sins of others – 2 Corinthians 5:21

77. Psa. 22:1 – “My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?” – Matthew 27:46

78. Psa. 22:2 – Darkness upon Calvary for three hours – Matthew 27:45

79. Psa. 22:7 – They shoot out the lip and shake the head – Matthew 27:39-44

80. Psa. 22:8 – “He trusted in God, let Him deliver Him” – Matthew 27:43

81. Psa. 22:9-10 – Born the Savior – Luke 2:7

82. Psa. 22:12-13 – They seek His death – John 19:6

83. Psa. 22:14 – His blood poured out when they pierced His side – John 19:34

84. Psa. 22:14, 15 – Suffered agony on Calvary – Mark 15:34-37

85. Psa. 22:15 – He thirsted – John 19:28

86. Psa. 22:16 – They pierced His hands and His feet – John 19:34, 37; 20:27

87. Psa. 22:17, 18 – Stripped Him before the stares of men – Luke 23:34, 35

88. Psa. 22:18 – They parted His garments – John 19:23, 24

89. Psa. 22:20, 21 – He committed Himself to God – Luke 23:46

90. Psa. 22:20, 21 – Satanic power bruising the Redeemer’s heel – Hebrews 2:14

91. Psa. 22:22 – His Resurrection declared – John 20:17

92. Psa. 22:27-28 – He shall be the governor of the nations – Col. 1:16

93. Psa. 22:31 – “It is finished” – John 19:30, Heb. 10:10, 12, 14, 18

94. Psa. 23:1 – “I am the Good Shepherd” – John 10:11, 1 Peter 2:25

95. Psa. 24:3 – His exaltation predicted – Acts 1:11; Philippians 2:9

96. Psa. 30:3 – His resurrection predicted – Acts 2:32

97. Psa. 31:5 – “Into thy hands I commit my spirit” – Luke 23:46

98. Psa. 31:11 – His acquaintances fled from Him – Mark 14:50

99. Psa. 31:13 – They took counsel to put Him to death – Mt. 27:1, John 11:53

100. Psa. 31:14, 15 – “He trusted in God, let Him deliver him” – Matthew 27:43

101. Psa. 34:20 – Not a bone of Him broken – John 19:31-36

102. Psa. 35:11 – False witnesses rose up against Him – Matthew 26:59

103. Psa. 35:19 – He was hated without a cause – John 15:25

104. Psa. 38:11 – His friends stood afar off – Luke 23:49

105. Psa. 38:12 – Enemies try to entangle Him by craft – Mark 14:1, Mt. 22:15

106. Psa. 38:12-13 – Silent before His accusers – Matthew 27:12-14

107. Psa. 38:20 – He went about doing good – Acts 10:38

108. Psa. 40:2-5 – The joy of His resurrection predicted – John 20:20

109. Psa. 40:6-8 – His delight-the will of the Father – John 4:34, Heb. 10:5-10

110. Psa. 40:9 – He was to preach the Righteousness in Israel – Matt. 4:17

111. Psa. 40:14 – Confronted by adversaries in the Garden – John 18:4-6

112. Psa. 41:9 – Betrayed by a familiar friend – John 13:18

113. Psa. 45:2 – Words of Grace come from His lips – John 1:17, Luke 4:22

114. Psa. 45:6 – To own the title, God or Elohim – Hebrews 1:8

115. Psa. 45:7 – A special anointing by the Holy Spirit – Mt. 3:16; Heb. 1:9

116. Psa. 45:7, 8 – Called the Christ (Messiah or Anointed) – Luke 2:11

117. Psa. 45:17 – His name remembered forever – Eph. 1:20-21, Heb. 1:8

118. Psa. 55:12-14 – Betrayed by a friend, not an enemy – John 13:18

119. Psa. 55:15 – Unrepentant death of the Betrayer – Matt. 27:3-5; Acts 1:16-19

120. Psa. 68:18 – To give gifts to men – Ephesians 4:7-16

121. Psa. 68:18 – Ascended into Heaven – Luke 24:51

122. Psa. 69:4 – Hated without a cause – John 15:25

123. Psa. 69:8 – A stranger to own brethren – John 1:11, 7:5

124. Psa. 69:9 – Zealous for the Lord’s House – John 2:17

125. Psa. 69:14-20 – Messiah’s anguish of soul before crucifixion -Matthew 26:36-45

126. Psa. 69:20 – “My soul is exceeding sorrowful.” – Matthew 26:38

127. Psa. 69:21 – Given vinegar in thirst – Matthew 27:34

128. Psa. 69:26 – The Savior given and smitten by God – John 17:4; 18:11

129. Psa. 72:10, 11 – Great persons were to visit Him – Matthew 2:1-11

130. Psa. 72:16 -The corn of wheat to fall into the Ground –  John 12:24-25

131. Psa. 72:17 – Belief on His name will produce offspring – John 1:12, 13

132. Psa. 72:17 – All nations shall be blessed by Him – Galatians 3:8

133. Psa. 72:17 – All nations shall call Him blessed – John 12:13, Rev. 5:8-12

134. Psa. 78:1-2 – He would teach in parables – Matthew 13:34-35

135. Psa. 78:2b – To speak the Wisdom of God with authority – Matt. 7:29

136. Psa. 80:17 – The Man of God’s right hand – Mark 14:61-62

137. Psa. 88 – The Suffering and Reproach of Calvary – Matthew 27:26-50

138. Psa. 88:8 – They stood afar off and watched – Luke 23:49

139. Psa. 89:27 – Firstborn – Colossians 1:15, 18

140. Psa. 89:27 – Emmanuel to be higher than earthly kings – Luke 1:32, 33

141. Psa. 89:35-37 – David’s Seed, throne, kingdom endure forever – Luke 1:32, 33

142. Psa. 89:36-37 – His character-Faithfulness – Revelation 1:5, 19:11

143. Psa. 90:2 – He is from everlasting – (Micah 5:2) John 1:1

144. Psa. 91:11, 12 – Identified as Messianic; used to tempt Christ – Luke 4:10, 11

145. Psa. 97:9 – His exaltation predicted – Acts 1:11; Ephesians 1:20

146. Psa. 100:5 – His character-Goodness – Matthew 19:16, 17

147. Psa. 102:1-11 – The Suffering and Reproach of Calvary – John 19:16-30

148. Psa. 102:25-27 – Messiah is the Preexistent Son – Hebrews 1:10-12

149. Psa. 109:25 – Ridiculed – Matthew 27:39

150. Psa. 110:1 – Son of David – Matthew 22:42-43

151. Psa. 110:1 – To ascend to the right-hand of the Father – Mark 16:19

152. Psa. 110:1 – David’s son called Lord – Matthew 22:44, 45

153. Psa. 110:4 – A priest after Melchizedek’s order – Hebrews 6:20

154. Psa. 112:4 – His character-Compassionate, Gracious, et al – Matt. 9:36

155. Psa. 118:17, 18 – Messiah’s Resurrection assured – Luke 24:5-7; 1Cor. 15:20

156. Psa. 118:22, 23 – The rejected stone is Head of the corner – Matt. 21:42, 43

157. Psa. 118:26a – The Blessed One presented to Israel – Matthew 21:9

158. Psa. 118:26b – To come while Temple standing – Matthew 21:12-15

159. Psa. 132:11 – The Seed of David (the fruit of His Body) – Luke 1:32, Act 2:30

160. Psa. 129:3 – He was scourged – Matthew 27:26

161. Psa. 138:1-6 – The supremacy of David’s Seed amazes kings – Matt. 2:2-6

162. Psa. 147:3, 6 – The earthly ministry of Christ described – Luke 4:18

163. Prov. 1:23 – He will send the Spirit of God – John 16:7

164. Prov. 8:23 – Foreordained from everlasting – Rev. 13:8, 1Peter 1:19-20

165. Song. 5:16 – The altogether lovely One – John 1:17

166. Isa. 2:3 – He shall teach all nations – John 4:25

167. Isa. 2:4 – He shall judge among the nations – John 5:22

168. Isa. 6:1 – When Isaiah saw His glory – John 12:40-41

169. Isa. 6:8 – The One Sent by God – John 12:38-45

170. Isa. 6:9-10 – Parables fall on deaf ears – Matthew 13:13-15

171. Isa. 6:9-12 – Blinded to Christ and deaf to His words – Acts 28:23-29

172. Isa. 7:14 – To be born of a virgin – Luke 1:35

173. Isa. 7:14 – To be Emmanuel-God with us – Matthew 1:18-23, 1Tim. 3:16

174. Isa. 8:8 – Called Emmanuel – Matthew 28:20

175. Isa. 8:14 – A stone of stumbling, a Rock of offense – 1 Peter 2:8

176. Isa. 9:1, 2 – His ministry to begin in Galilee – Matthew 4:12-17

177. Isa. 9:6 – A child born-Humanity – Luke 1:31

178. Isa. 9:6 – A Son given-Deity – Luke 1:32, John 1:14, 1Tim. 3:16

179. Isa. 9:6 – Declared to be the Son of God with power – Romans 1:3, 4

180. Isa. 9:6 – The Wonderful One, Peleh – Luke 4:22

181. Isa. 9:6 – The Counsellor, Yaatz – Matthew 13:54

182. Isa. 9:6 – The Mighty God, El Gibor – 1 Cor. 1:24, Titus 2:3

183. Isa. 9:6 – The Everlasting Father, Avi Adth – John 8:58, 10:30

184. Isa. 9:6 – The Prince of Peace, Sar Shalom – John 16:33

185. Isa. 9:7 – To establish an everlasting kingdom – Luke 1:32-33

186. Isa. 9:7 – His Character-Just – John 5:30

187. Isa. 9:7 – No end to his Government, Throne, and Peace – Luke 1:32-33

188. Isa. 11:1 – Called a Nazarene-the Branch, Netzer – Matthew 2:23

189. Isa. 11:1 – A rod out of Jesse-Son of Jesse – Luke 3:23, 32

190. Isa. 11:2 – Anointed One by the Spirit – Matthew 3:16, 17, Acts 10:38

191. Isa. 11:2 – His Character-Wisdom, Knowledge, et al – Colossians 2:3

192. Isa. 11:3 – He would know their thoughts – Luke 6:8, John 2:25

193. Isa. 11:4 – Judge in righteousness – Acts 17:31

194. Isa. 11:4 – Judges with the sword of His mouth – Rev. 2:16, 19:11, 15

195. Isa. 11:5 – Character: Righteous & Faithful – Rev. 19:11

196. Isa. 11:10 – The Gentiles seek Him – John 12:18-21

197. Isa. 12:2 – Called Jesus-Yeshua – Matthew 1:21

198. Isa. 22:22 – The One given all authority to govern – Revelation 3:7

199. Isa. 25:8 – The Resurrection predicted – 1 Corinthians 15:54

200. Isa. 26:19 – His power of Resurrection predicted – Matthew 27:50-54

201. Isa. 28:16 – The Messiah is the precious corner stone – Acts 4:11, 12

202. Isa. 28:16 – The Sure Foundation – 1 Corinthians 3:11, Mt. 16:18

203. Isa. 29:13 – He indicated hypocritical obedience to His Word – Matt. 15:7-9

204. Isa. 29:14 – The wise are confounded by the Word – 1 Corinthians 1:18-31

205. Isa. 32:2 – A Refuge-A man shall be a hiding place – Matthew 23:37

206. Isa. 35:4 – He will come and save you  -Matthew 1:21

207. Isa. 35:5-6 – To have a ministry of miracles – Matthew 11:2-6

208. Isa. 40:3, 4 – Preceded by forerunner – John 1:23

209. Isa. 40:9 – “Behold your God.” – John 1:36; 19:14

210. Isa. 40:10 – He will come to reward – Revelation 22:12

211. Isa. 40:11 – A shepherd-compassionate life-giver – John 10:10-18

212. Isa. 42:1-4 – The Servant-as a faithful, patient redeemer – Matthew 12:18-21

213. Isa. 42:2 – Meek and lowly – Matthew 11:28-30

214. Isa. 42:3 – He brings hope for the hopeless – John 4

215. Isa. 42:4 – The nations shall wait on His teachings – John 12:20-26

216. Isa. 42:6 – The Light (salvation) of the Gentiles -Luke 2:32

217. Isa. 42:1, 6 – His is a worldwide compassion – Matthew 28:19, 20

218. Isa. 42:7 – Blind eyes opened -John 9:25-38

219. Isa. 43:11 – He is the only Savior – Acts 4:12

220. Isa. 44:3 – He will send the Spirit of God – John 16:7, 13

221. Isa. 45:21-25 – He is Lord and Saviour – Philippians 3:20, Titus 2:13

222. Isa. 45:23 – He will be the Judge – John 5:22; Romans 14:11

223. Isa. 46:9, 10 – Declares things not yet done – John 13:19

224. Isa. 48:12 – The First and the Last John 1:30, – Revelation 1:8, 17

225. Isa. 48:16, 17 – He came as a Teacher – John 3:2

226. Isa. 49:1 – Called from the womb-His humanity – Matthew 1:18

227. Isa. 49:5 – A Servant from the womb – Luke 1:31, Philippians 2:7

228. Isa. 49:6 – He will restore Israel – Acts 3:19-21, 15:16-17

229. Isa. 49:6 – He is Salvation for Israel – Luke 2:29-32

230. Isa. 49:6 – He is the Light of the Gentiles – John 8:12, Acts 13:47

231. Isa. 49:6 – He is Salvation unto the ends of the earth – Acts 15:7-18

232. Isa. 49:7 – He is despised of the Nation – John 1:11, 8:48-49, 19:14-15

233. Isa. 50:3 – Heaven is clothed in black at His humiliation – Luke 23:44, 45

234. Isa. 50:4 – He is a learned counselor for the weary – Matthew 7:29, 11:28, 29

235. Isa. 50:5 – The Servant bound willingly to obedience – Matthew 26:39

236. Isa. 50:6a – “I gave my back to the smiters.” – Matthew 27:26

237. Isa. 50:6b – He was smitten on the cheeks – Matthew 26:67

238. Isa. 50:6c – He was spat upon – Matthew 27:30

239. Isa. 52:7 – Published good tidings upon mountains  – Matt. 5:12,15:29, 28:16

240. Isa. 52:13 The Servant exalted Acts 1:8-11; Eph. 1:19-22, Php. 2:5-9

241. Isa. 52:14 The Servant shockingly abused Luke 18:31-34; Mt. 26:67, 68

242. Isa. 52:15n – Nations startled by message of the Servant – LK 18:31-34; Mt. 26:68

243. Isa. 52:15 – His blood shed sprinkles nations – Hebrews 9:13-14, Rev. 1:5

244. Isa. 53:1 – His people would not believe Him – John 12:37-38

245. Isa. 53:2 – Appearance of an ordinary man – Philippians 2:6-8

246. Isa. 53:3a – Despised – Luke 4:28-29

247. Isa. 53:3b – Rejected – Matthew 27:21-23

248. Isa. 53:3c – Great sorrow and grief – Matt. 26:37-38, Luke 19:41, Heb. 4:15

249. Isa. 53:3d – Men hide from being associated with Him – Mark 14:50-52

250. Isa. 53:4a – He would have a healing ministry – Matthew 8:16-17

251. Isa. 53:4b – Thought to be cursed by God – Matthew 26:66, 27:41-43

252. Isa. 53:5a – Bears penalty for mankind’s iniquities – 2 Cor. 5:21, Heb. 2:9

253. Isa. 53:5b – His sacrifice provides peace between man and God – Col. 1:20

254. Isa. 53:5c – His sacrifice would heal man of sin – 1 Peter 2:24

255. Isa. 53:6a – He would be the sin-bearer for all mankind – 1 John 2:2, 4:10

256. Isa. 53:6b – God’s will that He bear sin for all mankind – Galatians 1:4

257. Isa. 53:7a – Oppressed and afflicted – Matthew 27:27-31

258. Isa. 53:7b – Silent before his accusers – Matthew 27:12-14

259. Isa. 53:7c – Sacrificial lamb – John 1:29, 1 Peter 1:18-19

260. Isa. 53:8a – Confined and persecuted – Matthew 26:47-27:31

261. Isa. 53:8b – He would be judged – John 18:13-22

262. Isa. 53:8c – Killed – Matthew 27:35

263. Isa. 53:8d – Dies for the sins of the world – 1 John 2:2

264. Isa. 53:9a – Buried in a rich man’s grave – Matthew 27:57

265. Isa. 53:9b – Innocent and had done no violence – Luke 23:41, John 18:38

266. Isa. 53:9c – No deceit in his mouth – 1 Peter 2:22

267. Isa. 53:10a – God’s will that He die for mankind – John 18:11

268. Isa. 53:10b – An offering for sin – Matthew 20:28, Galatians 3:13

269. Isa. 53:10c – Resurrected and live forever – Romans 6:9

270. Isa. 53:10d – He would prosper – John 17:1-5

271. Isa. 53:11a – God fully satisfied with His suffering – John 12:27

272. Isa. 53:11b – God’s servant would justify man – Romans 5:8-9, 18-19

273. Isa. 53:11c – The sin-bearer for all mankind – Hebrews 9:28

274. Isa. 53:12a – Exalted by God because of his sacrifice – Matthew 28:18

275. Isa. 53:12b – He would give up his life to save mankind – Luke 23:46

276. Isa. 53:12c – Numbered with the transgressors – Mark 15:27-28

277. Isa. 53:12d – Sin-bearer for all mankind – 1 Peter 2:24

278. Isa. 53:12e – Intercede to God in behalf of mankind – Luke 23:34, Rom. 8:34

279. Isa. 55:3 – Resurrected by God – Acts 13:34

280. Isa. 55:4a – A witness – John 18:37

281. Isa. 55:4b – He is a leader and commander – Hebrews 2:10

282. Isa. 55:5 – God would glorify Him – Acts 3:13

283. Isa. 59:16a – Intercessor between man and God – Matthew 10:32

284. Isa. 59:16b – He would come to provide salvation – John 6:40

285. Isa. 59:20 – He would come to Zion as their Redeemer – Luke 2:38

286. Isa. 60:1-3 – He would be a light to the Gentiles – Acts 26:23

287. Isa. 61:1a – The Spirit of God upon him – Matthew 3:16-17

288. Isa. 61:1b – The Messiah would preach the good news – Luke 4:16-21

289. Isa. 61:1c – Provide freedom from the bondage of sin – John 8:31-36

290. Isa. 61:1-2a – Proclaim a period of grace – Galatians 4:4-5

291. Jer. 23:5-6 – Descendant of David – Luke 3:23-31

292. Jer. 23:5-6 – The Messiah would be both God and Man – Jn 13:13, 1 Ti 3:16

293. Jer. 31:22 – Born of a virgin – Matthew 1:18-20

294. Jer. 31:31 – The Messiah would be the new covenant – Matthew 26:28

295. Jer. 33:14-15 – Descendant of David – Luke 3:23-31

296. Eze.34:23-24 – Descendant of David – Matthew 1:1

297. Eze.37:24-25 – Descendant of David – Luke 1:31-33

298. Dan. 2:44-45 – The Stone that shall break the kingdoms – Matthew 21:44

299. Dan. 7:13-14a – He would ascend into heaven -Acts 1:9-11

300. Dan. 7:13-14b – Highly exalted – Ephesians 1:20-22

301. Dan. 7:13-14c – His dominion would be everlasting – Luke 1:31-33

302. Dan. 9:24a – To make an end to sins – Galatians 1:3-5

303. Dan. 9:24a – To make reconciliation for iniquity – Rom. 5:10, 2 Cor. 5:18-21

304. Dan. 9:24b – He would be holy – Luke 1:35

305. Dan. 9:25 – His announcement-  John 12:12-13

306. Dan. 9:26a – Cut off -Matthew 16:21, 21:38-39

307. Dan. 9:26b – Die for the sins of the world -Hebrews 2:9

308. Dan. 9:26c – Killed before the destruction of the temple – Matthew 27:50-51

309. Dan. 10:5-6 – Messiah in a glorified state – Revelation 1:13-16

310. Hos. 11:1 – He would be called out of Egypt – Matthew 2:15

311. Hos. 13:14 – He would defeat death – 1 Corinthians 15:55-57

312. Joel 2:32 – Offer salvation to all mankind – Romans 10:9-13

313. Jonah 1:17 – Death and resurrection of Christ – Matthew 12:40, 16:4

314. Mic. 5:2a – Born in Bethlehem – Matthew 2:1-6

315. Mic. 5:2b – Ruler in Israel – Luke 1:33

316. Mic. 5:2c – From everlasting – John 8:58

317. Hag. 2:6-9 – He would visit the second Temple – Luke 2:27-32

318. Hag. 2:23 – Descendant of Zerubbabel – Luke 2:27-32

319. Zech. 3:8 – God’s servant – John 17:4

320. Zech. 6:12-13 – Priest and King – Hebrews 8:1

321. Zech. 9:9a – Greeted with rejoicing in Jerusalem – Matthew 21:8-10

322. Zech. 9:9b – Beheld as King – John 12:12-13

323. Zech. 9:9c -The Messiah would be just – John 5:30

324. Zech. 9:9d – The Messiah would bring salvation – Luke 19:10

325. Zech. 9:9e – The Messiah would be humble – Matthew 11:29

326. Zech. 9:9f – Presented to Jerusalem riding on a donkey – Matthew 21:6-9

327. Zech. 10:4 – The cornerstone – Ephesians 2:20

328. Zech. 11:4-6a – At His coming, Israel to have unfit leaders – Matthew 23:1-4

329. Zech. 11:4-6b – Rejection causes God to remove His protection – Luke 19:41-44

330. Zech. 11:4-6c – Rejected in favor of another king – John 19:13-15

331. Zech. 11:7 – Ministry to “poor,” the believing remnant – Matthew 9:35-36

332. Zech. 11:8a – Unbelief forces Messiah to reject them – Matthew 23:33

333. Zech. 11:8b – Despised – Matthew 27:20

334. Zech. 11:9 – Stops ministering to those who rejected Him – Matthew 13:10-11

335. Zech. 11:10-11a – Rejection causes God to remove protection – Luke 19:41-44

336. Zech. 11:10-11b – The Messiah would be God – John 14:7

337. Zech. 11:12-13a – Betrayed for thirty pieces of silver – Matthew 26:14-15

338. Zech. 11:12-13b – Rejected – Matthew 26:14-15

339. Zech. 11:12-13c – Thirty pieces of silver cast in the house of the Lord – Matt. 27:3-5

340. Zech. 11:12-13d – The Messiah would be God  – John 12:45

341. Zech. 12:10a – The Messiah’s body would be pierced – John 19:34-37

342. Zech. 12:10b – The Messiah would be both God and man – John 10:30

343. Zech. 12:10c – The Messiah would be rejected  – John 1:11

344. Zech. 13:7a  – God’s will He die for mankind – John 18:11

345. Zech. 13:7b – A violent death – Mark 14:27

346. Zech. 13:7c – Both God and man – John 14:9

347. Zech. 13:7d – Israel scattered as a result of rejecting Him – Matthew 26:31-56

348. Zech. 14:4  – He would return to the Mt. of Olives  – Acts 1:11-12

349. Mal. 3:1a- Messenger to prepare the way for Messiah – Mark 1:1-8

350. Mal. 3:1b – Sudden appearance at the temple – Mark 11:15-16

351. Mal. 3:1c – Messenger of the new covenant – Luke 4:43

352. Mal. 3:6 – The God who changes not – Hebrews 13:8

353. Mal. 4:5 – Forerunner in spirit of Elijah – Mt. 3:1-3, 11:10-14, 17:11-13

354. Mal. 4:6 – Forerunner would turn many to righteousness – Luke 1:16-17

 

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BOOK REVIEW OF NICHOLAS WOLTERSTORFF’S “LAMENT FOR A SON”

REVIEWED BY DR. DAVID P. CRAIG

LAMENT FOR A SON

HELPS US GRIEVE IN A HEALTHY AND BIBLICAL MANNER

Nicholas Wolterstorff is a brilliant professor of Philosophical Theology at Yale Divinity School in New Haven, Connecticut. This little book (111 pages) can be read as short devotionals; in one sitting; or used as a resource to guide a person through their own grief or helping a friend in their own grief.

What makes this book unique is that Nicholas wrote the book as a very personal expression of his own grief in grappling with the death of his son (aged 25) who died in a rock climbing mishap while living in Europe in 1983. Wolterstorff’s journaling allows the reader to enter into one’s pain at an emotional, theological, and philosophical level.

The most helpful section of the book is when Wolterstorff delves into how God suffers with us in our losses, and how he contemplates the sufferings of God the Father and His own Son’s death on the cross for the sins of humanity.

Reading this book makes one appreciate the brevity, emotions, and depths of ultimate meaning in contemplating what loss signifies; and what ultimate gain means because of the reality of the Gospel – that Jesus empathizes with our plight and has entered into our suffering from the inside out. I highly recommend this book for parents that have lost a child; widows and widowers; and pastors, counselors, and friends who seek to comfort their friends who have experienced the loss of a loved one (especially a young child or young adult).

The author has done grievers a great service by entering into his own pain; the suffering of God; and gives us helps for wrestling with our pain in grief. This book can only help lighten the load of grief for those experiencing great loss. I would also recommend this book be used as a gift to give to loved ones grappling with the big question: “Where is God in all of my pain?”

 

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Dr. Walt Russell on The Biblical Concept of Discipling Others

MULTIPLYING COMMUNITIES THROUGH DISCIPLESHIP

Two surfers walking on the beach

In many respects the last generation’s barrage of literature on the subject of “discipleship” has generated more heat and smoke than light. Many contradictory  constructs have been offered. What does the Bible say about being “a disciple” and “discipling” others? Is there a word from God upon which we in the church can build a biblical and consistent philosophy of ministry discipleship? Where do we fit in all of the valuable data about character development gained from research in the social sciences? Is the integration of the biblical view of a discipleship ministry with the social science view of character development ever possible? Hopefully, this article will begin to answer some of these vital questions. This attempt will first seek to lay a biblical foundation and framework for discipling others; and secondly, to suggest a general philosophy of discipleship from the biblical concept.

THE BIBLICAL CONCEPT OF “DISCIPLE”

The Derivation of the Concept of “Disciple” One searches the Old Testament in vain to find the term “disciple” or even to find the contemporary concept of “discipleship” within the pages of Israel’s history and literature. One wonders if persons were “discipled” in Israel since the Word of God does not emphasize such a concept. The only possible answer is “Yes, they must have been ‘discipled,’ but perhaps through somewhat differant means than normally advocated by contemporary advocates.” The Hebrew theocracy was set up by Yahweh to emphasize the nation’s relationship as a whole to Yahweh. The emphasis was corporate and all teaching and learning were related directly to the revealed will of God. There was no room for men to speak authoritatively to other men apart from the revelation from God (Kittel, 427 – Much of the research data in this section has come from the article mathetes in the Theological Dictionary of the New Testament, Vol, IV, pages 415-460), edited by Gerhard Kittel. This article will be referred to in this essay as “Kittel,” with the appropriate page number). Also, the training and maturing of the youth was centered in the home (e.g., Deu. 6). Israel found no room in such a structure for the classic discipler/disciple relationship as pictured today. Moses did not “disciple” Joshua per se. rather, Joshua was Moses’ “servant” (Hebrew, ebed). The prophets did not have disciples, but rather they had assistants and servants (e.g., na’ar in 1 Kings 18:43) (Kittel, 428).

The basic concept of “disciple” that one finds in the gospels and the concept that is used as the model for discipleship in the church is derived from Greek philosophy and Rabbinical Judaism (Kittel, 431-441). The Greek term mathetes “disciple” was used of a member of a philosophical school, a student of medicine, or an apprecntice of a trade in hellenistic culture (Kittel, 438-40). In Rabbinical Judaism a “disciple” attached himself to a teacher or rabbi in much the same manner as was done in Hellenistic culture (which was the source of Judaism’s practice). The disciple subordinated himself in almost servile fashion to his rabbi in order to learn all that the rabbi had to teach. In both the Hellenistic and Jewish cultures two very significant observations could be made about the rold of the disciple:

(1) The time spent as a “disciple” was only transitory until the disciple could become the teacher, rabbi, doctor, tradesman, etc.

(2) The emphasis in both cultures wa generally on objective content (e.g., learning a trade). There are notable exceptions like Socrates’ methodology, but generally this observation holds true. Jesus’ usage of the concept “disciple” in the gospels is obviously derived from Rabbinical Judaism (and ultimately from Greek culture). However, He greatly midified the general concept by emphasizing at least four unique aspects:

(1) Being a “disciple” of His was not a transitory stage that one passed through on the way to a more sophisticated and respected level. Rather, being a disciple of Jesus was a permanent relationship and was the climax of every man’s aspirations (Kittel, p. 448).

(2) Jesus called His disciples they did not select Him as their Rabbi.

(3) Jesus emphasized commitment to His Person first, and then commitment to objective content about His Person. In a sense these are inseparable, but according to Jesus’ emphasis the commitment to His Person not just His teaching was given priority (e.g. Mark 1:17 and John 21:21-22).

(4) Jesus emphasized faith in Him as the true test of a disciple’s commitment (e.g. John 6:60-66). This emphasis is totally unique and unparalleled in Greek and Jewish culture.

At this point one may question the need to go so deeply into the historical derivation of the concept of “discipleship”. Very crucial and necessary applications will be drawn from this historical data that will be foundational in forming a biblical structure for discipling others. These applications will be made in the second part of this essay. First, we must explore the biblical usage of the term “disciple”.

The Biblical Usage of “Disciple”

The word mathetes (“disciple”) occurs 268 times in the New Testament. Thirty of these occurences are in the Book of Acts and the rest are distributed among the gospels, particualrly in matthew (74 times) and John (81 times). Perhaps at this point it would be interesting to see how contemporary writers feel “disciple” is defined. The following is a representative example of the plethora of such definitions: “Disciple: A Christian who is growing in conformity to Christ, is achieving fruit in evangelism, and is working in follow-up to conserve his fruit.” (Gary W. Kuhne, The Dynamics of Personal Follow-Up, 130). This comprehensive disciple

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

walter_russell_faculty

WALTER RUSSELL is a Professor of Bible Exposition at Talbot School of Theology in La Mirada, CA. He earned his degrees at Westminster Theological Seminary (Ph.D.); St. Mary’s Seminary (M.A.); Dallas Theological Seminary (Th.M.); and University of Missouri (B.S.). Dr. Russell’s areas of expertise are exegesis, hermeneutics, and New Testament theology, especially as they relate to world evangelism and the spiritual growth of the church. He has an extensive background in collegiate ministries, university teaching, and the pastorate, having planted two churches. He authored The Flesh/Spirit Conflict in Galatians and Playing with Fire: How the Bible Ignites Change in Your Soul. Dr. Russell has contributed articles to Bibliotheca SacraJournal of the Evangelical Theological SocietyGrace Theological JournalWestminster Theological JournalTrinity Journal, and Christianity Today. His life themes are the primacy of the Great Commission in the life of the church, the renewal of the church through the development of dynamic community, and the strengthening of the church through vibrant teaching of the Scriptures.

 
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Posted by on November 6, 2015 in Discipleship

 

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A GUIDE FOR PRAYING THE ATTRIBUTES OF GOD

PRAYING THE ATTRIBUTES OF GOD

Praying with Your eyes open Richard Pratt

(Adapted from Appendix B in Pray With Your Eyes Open by Richard L. Pratt Jr.)

Incommunicable Attributes (Qualities that belong to God alone):

INDEPENDENT: “…He does whatever pleases Him” (Ps. 115:3; cf. John 5:26; Rom. 11:35-36).

INFINITE: “…from everlasting to everlasting” (Ps. 90:1-2; cf. Pss. 33:11; 93:2; 145:13; Heb. 1:8-12).

ETERNAL: “…the LORD, the Eternal God” (Gen. 21:33; cf. Neh. 9:5-6; John 8:58; Rev. 1:8).

INCOMPREHENSIBLE: “…beyond our understanding” (Job 36:26; cf. Isa. 40:18-26; Matt. 11:27; Rom. 11:33-34).

PRE-EMINENT: “…all things were created by Him and for Him…” (Col. 1:15-19; cf. Exod. 15:1,11, 18; Rev. 19:11-16).

SOVEREIGN: “I will do all that I please…” (isa. 46:10; cf. Ps. 135:6; Dan. 4:35; Eph. 1:11).

TRANSCENDENT: “…beyond our reach…” (Job 37:23; cf. Exod. 33:20-23; Ps. 104:1-4; Isa. 40:21-26; 1 Tim. 6:15-16).

THE ONE AND ONLY: “…there is but one God…” (1 Cor. 8:6; cf. Deut. 6:4; Isa. 45:21-22; 1 Tim. 2:5).

MAJESTIC: “In the greatness of Your Majesty…” (Exod. 15:7; cf. 15:6, 11; Job 37:22; Ps. 8:1,9; Jude 25).

EVERYWHERE (OMNIPRESENT) : “Do not I fill heaven and earth?” (Jer. 23:23-24; cf. 2 Chron. 2:6; Ps. 139:7-16; Acts 17:272-8).

ALL-KNOWING (OMNISCIENT): “…You alone know the hearts of all men…” (1 Kings 8:39; cf. Ps. 139:1-6; Prov. 3:19-20; 1 Cor. 2:10).

ALL-POWERFUL (OMNIPOTENT) : “…Is anything too hard for the LORD?” (Gen. 18:14; cf. 1 Sam. 2:6-7; Ps. 18:13-15; Rev. 19:6).

UNCHANGING (IMMUTABLE) “…You remain the same…” (Ps. 102:27; cf. Mal. 3:6;James 1:17; Hebrews 13:8).

Communicable Attributes (Belong to God & can be reflected in us via the HS):

HOLINESS: “Your ways, O God, are holy” (Ps. 77:13; cf. Isa. 6:3; 57:15; 1 Peter 1:15-16; Rev. 4:8).

WISDOM: “…magnificent in wisdom…” (Isa. 28:29; cf. Jer. 10:12; 1 Cor. 1:30; Col. 2:2-3).

TRUTHFULNESS: “…God is truthful…” (John 3:33; cf. Num. 23:19; Isa. 45:19; John 14:6).

LOVE: “…His unfailing love…” (Ps. 33:5,18, 22; cf. Exod. 15:13; Pss. 13:5-6; 89:2; Rom. 8:38-39; Eph. 3:17-19; 5:1-2).

GOODNESS: “…He is good…” (2 Chron. 7:3; cf. Gen. 1:31; Pss. 119:68;145:9; Mark 10:18).

FAITHFULNESS: “…He is the faithful God…” (Deut. 7:9; cf. Pss. 33:4; 100:5; 1 Cor. 1:9; 1 Thess. 5:24).

MERCY: “…His mercy is great…” (2 Sam. 24:14; cf. Neh. 9:31; Dan. 9:9; Luke 1:50, 54).

KINDNESS: “…He shows unfailing kindness…” (2 Sam. 22:51; cf. isa. 54:8; Jer. 9:24; Romans 11:22).

PATIENCE: “…His unlimited patience…” (1 Tim. 1:16; cf. Neh. 9:30; Rom. 3:25; 2 Peter 3:15).

JUSTICE: “…all His ways are just…” (Deut. 32:4; cf. Job 37:23; Psalm 99:4; Luke 18:7-8).

RIGHTEOUSNESS: “…My righteousness will never fail…” (Isa. 51:6; cf. Ps. 89:14; Jer. 23:5-6; 1 Cor. 1:30).

WRATH: “…expresses His wrath every day…” (Ps. 7:11; cf. Deut. 29:28; Isa. 13:13; Rom. 1:18; 5:9; 9:22; Rev. 19:15).

JEALOUSY: “…a jealous God…” (Exod. 34:14; cf. Deut. 4:24; Nah. 1:2; Zech. 8:2; 2 Cor. 11:2).

GRACE: “…God, gracious, and compassionate…” (Neh. 9:17; cf. Exod. 34:6-7; Isa. 26:10; 2 Tim. 1:9; Titus 3:5-7).

 
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Posted by on October 28, 2015 in Prayer Helps

 

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